Questions tagged [path-integral]

The path integral formulation of quantum mechanics is a description of quantum theory that generalizes the action principle of classical mechanics. It replaces the classical notion of a single, unique classical trajectory for a system with a sum, or functional integral, over an infinity of quantum-mechanically possible trajectories to compute a quantum amplitude. This formulation has proven crucial to the subsequent development of theoretical physics.

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1answer
523 views

Peter Freyd on path Integral?

In the issue Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science Volume 29, 1999, Page 79 there is a very intriguing abstract by Peter Freyd. Path Integrals, Bayesian Vision, and Is Gaussian Quadrature ...
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177 views

Ratios of Gaussian integrals with a positive semidefinite matrix

Cross-post from MSE https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/4118128/ratios-of-gaussian-integrals-with-a-positive-semidefinite-matrix Generally speaking, I’m wondering what the usual identities for ...
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References for computing $n$-point correlations in Chern-Simons theory

I am interested in learning how to compute $n$-point correlation functions in Chern-Simons theory, thought of as a TQFT (similar to Witten's work linking that theory to knot theory). I am mostly ...
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1answer
287 views

Path integral as quantum mechanics on the tangent bundle

Let $X$ be a configuration space, a finite-dimensional manifold. By "quantum mechanics on $X$" I mean a linear evolution equation on complex-valued functions on $X$, determined by a ...
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661 views

Yang-Mills theory with non-compact gauge groups G

Physicists are familiar working with Yang-Mills theory with compact and semi-simple gauge groups $G$ (Lie groups). However, it is not entirely clear the formulation of Yang-Mills theory with non-...
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Mathematics of path integral: state of the art

I was told that one of the most efficient tools (e.g. in terms of computations relevant to physics, but also in terms of guessing heuristically mathematical facts) that physicists use is the so called ...