Questions tagged [ordered-groups]

Groups (possibly semigroups) endowed with possibly left/right/bi-invariant partial/total orderings. Study of such orders on groups.

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How can you order a free group?

A left order on a (discrete) group $G$ is a total order on $G$ satisfying $\forall g,h,k \in G: g < h \implies kg < kh$. A right order is defined symmetrically, and a biorder is an order that is ...
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Unique product groups (and semigroups)

A group $G$ is called a u.p.-group (short for unique product group) if for all nonempty finite subsets $A,B\subseteq G$, there exists an element $g\in A \cdot B$ which can be uniquely written as a ...
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Is there a name for this kind of structure? (Not quite a lattice-ordered group)

I'm looking at a certain class of groups $G$ that come with a partial order $\le$ on the elements. So far it looks like $(G,\le)$ has the following properties: The partial order is invariant under ...
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Closed and bounded intervals of definably complete ordered groups

True or false? All closed and bounded intervals of definably complete ordered groups are definably compact. Let $G$ be an ordered abelian group. Then, a definable subset $D ⊆ G$ is said to be ...
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Amenable groups acting on the real line, that are not subexponentially-amenable

In the literature, there are several examples of solvable groups acting faithfully by order-preserving homeomorphisms of the real line. There are also examples of groups of intermediate growth with ...
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What is known about orbifolding ordered groups and sets? Who has been involved? Links to Lee metrics?

In mathematical music theory several ordered groups are considered. Some examples contain the frequency space or Tonnetzes. Other groups (commutative and non-commutative ones) are discussed by Dawid ...
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Partial orders on $\mathbb{N}^m$ compatible with addition

I'm looking for a classification (or just non-trivial examples) of partial orders on monoid $\mathbb{N}^{m}$ that are compatible with addition. That is, partial orders $\leq$ satisfying two additional ...
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68 views

Extending a representation of a free group to an extension of a mapping torus

Given a free group on $n$ generators, $F_n$, $\phi$ an automorphism of $F_n$, and a non-trivial representation $\rho: F_n \rightarrow \operatorname{Homeo}_+(\mathbb{R})$, are necessary and sufficient ...
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574 views

Braided lobsters

If $(X,m)$ is a median algebra, then for each $x\in X$, define an operation $\wedge_{x}$ by letting $y\wedge_{x}z=m(x,y,z)$. Then $(X,\wedge_{x})$ is a meet-semilattice with least element $x$. Define ...
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A Krull-Schmidt theorem for partially ordered groups

If $G$ is a po-group (ie. partially ordered group), we say that $G$ is po-indecomposable if it's not the direct product of two non trivial subgroups (such subgroups are necessary convex and normal). ...
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An equivariant Hahn embedding theorem?

The Hahn Embedding Theorem asserts that for any (linearly) ordered abelian group $\Lambda$, there exists a linearly ordered indexing set $\Omega$ such that $\Lambda$ admits an order-preserving group ...
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Compatibility with multiplication of a cyclic order on a ring

I am copying my question from here: https://math.stackexchange.com/q/3233462/427611. Is it correct that $\mathbb Z/3\mathbb Z$ and $\mathbb Z/4\mathbb Z$ are the only rings with three or more ...
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61 views

Pure (ordered) subgroups

Let $H,G$ be abelian groups with $H \leq G$. We say that $H$ is a pure subgroup of $G$ if for every $n \in \mathbb N$ and $h \in H$ the following holds: If $h$ is $n$-divisible in $G$, then $h$ is $n$-...
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Relations between $\Omega$-groups, locally indicable groups, and right-orderable groups

We know that the class of right-orderable groups $\mathit{RO}$, is contained in the class of $\Omega$-groups (read it from "A note on group rings of certain torsion-free groups" by Burns-Hale). A ...