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Questions tagged [gn.general-topology]

Continuum theory, point-set topology, spaces with algebraic structure, foundations, dimension theory, local and global properties.

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A group allowing exactly 7 group topologies

Is there a group $G$ allowing exactly 7 group topologies on $G$: $\mathcal T_{\text{trivial}}, \mathcal T_{\text{discrete}}, \mathcal T_1, \mathcal T_2,\mathcal T_3,\mathcal T_4, \mathcal T_5$ with $$...
27
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1answer
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How many polynomial Morse functions on the sphere?

Let $f$ be a homogeneous polynomial of degree $d$ in $n$ variables. Restricted to the unit sphere $S^{n-1}$, it might or might not be a Morse function. If $f$ is a Morse function of degree $1$, you ...
27
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1answer
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Does this knot invariant distinguish trefoil chiralities?

Let $C_N$ denote the labelled configuration of $N^{th}$ roots of unity with $p_J = e^{\frac{2\pi iJ}{N}}$ for $J = 1\ldots N$. As a corollary of something else I was playing around with, I recently ...
27
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3answers
661 views

What is the structure preserved by strong equivalence of metrics?

Let $X$ be a set. Then we can define at least three equivalence relations on the set of metrics on $X$. We say that two metrics $d_1$ and $d_2$ are topologically equivalent if the identity maps $i:(...
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2answers
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Dynamical properties of injective continuous functions on $\mathbb{R}^d$

Let $\varphi:\mathbb{R}^d\to\mathbb{R}^d$ be an injective continuous function. Denote by $\varphi_n$ the $n$-th iterate of $\varphi$, i.e. $\varphi_n(x)=\varphi_{n-1}(\varphi(x))$ for all $x\in\...
27
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1answer
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Are the Sierpiński cardinal $\acute{\mathfrak n}$ and its measure modification $\acute{\mathfrak m}$ equal to some known small uncountable cardinals?

This question was motivated by an answer to this question of Dominic van der Zypen. It relates to the following classical theorem of Sierpiński. Theorem (Sierpiński, 1921). For any countable ...
27
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1answer
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Can closed compacts in a topological group behave “paradoxically” with respect to unions, intersections, and one-sided translations?

Consider two closed compacts $A$ and $B$ in a topological group $\Gamma$. Let $A'$ be a left translation of $A$ and $B'$ a left translation of $B$: $A' = aA$, $B' = bB$. Suppose it is known that $A'\...
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4answers
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Does the Brouwer fixed point theorem admit a constructive proof?

Wikipedia and a few websites (and a few mathoverflow answers) say there is a constructive proof of the Brouwer fixed point theorem, some others say no. The argument for a constructive proof is always ...
26
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6answers
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Is there a topology on growth rates of functions?

I've often idly wondered one can say about the collection of "growth rates". By growth rate, let's say we mean an equivalence class of functions (0,infty) \to (0,\infty), where two functions f_1,f_2 ...
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3answers
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Why the name 'separable' space?

It is well known that a separable space is a topological space that has a countable dense subset. I am wondering how is this related to the name 'separable'? Any intuition where the name come from?
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The ants-on-a-ball problem

Suppose I put an ant in a tiny racecar on every face of a soccer ball. Each ant then drives around the edges of her face counterclockwise. The goal is to prove that two of the ants will eventually ...
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3answers
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Proving that a function's image contains (1/n,…,1/n)

This question is a follow-up to a previous question answered by Neil Strickland: Map from simplex to itself that preserves sub-simplices Let $B$ denote the closed unit ball in $\mathbb{R}^2$ and let ...
26
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5answers
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Two-to-one continuous mapping from R² to R²

Hello. I have a question. Does there exist a continuous mapping $F:\mathbb{R}^2\rightarrow\mathbb{R}^2$ such that for every $c\in F(\mathbb{R}^2)$ there are two and only two points $z_{1}$, $z_{2}$...
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1answer
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Fake versus Exotic

Without recourse to the Disc Theorem (or its progeny), is it true that all known examples of exotic differentiable structures on 4-manifolds would be fake rather than exotic? Terminology (perhaps non-...
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3answers
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A rare property of Hausdorff spaces

Is there a Hausdorff topological space $X$ such that for any continuous map $f: X\longrightarrow \mathbb{R}$ and any $x\in \mathbb{R}$, the set $f^{-1}(x)$ is either empty or infinite?
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3answers
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Does $M^o=N^o$ imply that $\partial M = \partial N$?

let $M$ be a smooth $n$-manifold with boundary $\partial M$; I denote by $M^o$ the internal part of $M$, that is $M \smallsetminus \partial M$. The question is the same as in the title: let $M$ and $N$...
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3answers
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The deep significance of the question of the Mandelbrot set's local connectedness?

I am given to understand that the celebrated open problem (MLC) of the Mandelbrot set's local connectness has broader and deeper significance deeper than some mere curiosity of point-set topology. ...
25
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2answers
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Does Arzelà-Ascoli require choice?

Inspired by a recent Math.SE question entitled Where do we need the axiom of choice in Riemannian geometry?, I was thinking of the Arzelà--Ascoli theorem. Let's state a very simple version: ...
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4answers
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Which spaces are inverse limits of discrete spaces ?

There is the following theorem: "A space $X$ is the inverse limit of a system of discrete finite spaces, if and only if $X$ is totally disconnected, compact and Hausdorff." A finite discrete space ...
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3answers
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A question about subsets of plane

Is there a subset $X$ of plane with two points $x, y$ such that each one of $X \setminus \{x\}$, $X \setminus \{y\}$ is isometric to $X$? I tried hard to construct a counterexample but failed. Sorry ...
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17answers
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Applications of Brouwer's fixed point theorem

I'm presenting Brouwer's fixed point theorem to an audience that knows some point-set topology. Does anyone have any zippy / enlightening / cool applications or consequences of it? So far, I have: ...
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6answers
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Applications of string topology structure

Chas and Sullivan constructed in 1999 a Batalin-Vilkovisky algebra structure on the shifted homology of the loop space of a manifold: $\mathbb{H}_*(LM) := H_{*+d}(LM;\mathbb{Q})$. This structure ...
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2answers
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A question about “Zariski dense” arguments

This question is a little basic, but I think it is consistent with the goals of MO. My question is about a certain type of argument in algebraic geometry which exploits the abundance of dense sets ...
24
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1answer
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Which powers of the closed unit interval are homeomorphic?

It is known that no two distinct finite powers of the closed unit interval are homeomorphic: $I^m$ is homeomorphic to $I^n$ iff $m=n$. (Brouwer, Lebesgue, 1911) Is the analogous result for infinite ...
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1answer
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Closed balls vs closure of open balls

We work in a separable metric space $(X,d)$. With $\overline{B}(x,r)$ I denote the closed ball around $x$ of radius $r$, and with $cl \ B(x,r)$ I denote the closure of the open ball. Clearly, we ...
24
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1answer
941 views

Which spaces have the (weak) homotopy type of compact Hausdorff spaces?

Inspired by the discussion in the comments of this question, I'd like to ask the following question: is it possible to characterize the class of spaces that are homotopy equivalent (or weak equivalent)...
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3answers
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Is “compact implies sequentially compact” consistent with ZF?

Over at the nForum, we've been discussing sequential compactness. The discussion led me to realise that I naively assumed that nets were simply Big Sequences, and that I could make a reasonable guess ...
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0answers
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Why are quasitopological spaces needed in sheaf theoretic approaches to the h-principle?

Recently I have been learning more about the h-principle and in particular the methods of "continuous sheaves". In many treatments of this I see people using "quasi-topological spaces" and I am trying ...
23
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8answers
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Is there a compact group of countably infinite cardinality?

Apologies for the very simple question, but I can't seem to find a reference one way or the other, and it's been bugging me for a while now. Is there a compact (Hausdorff, or even T1) (topological) ...
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6answers
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Least number of charts to describe a given manifold

Hello, I'm wondering if there is a standard reference discussing the least number of charts in an atlas of a given manifold required to describe it. E.g. a circle requires at least two charts, and ...
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Why the triangle inequality?

[Maybe this is asking to be closed; but I thought I'd risk it.] A metric satisfies the axioms: $d(x,y)=0$ if and only if $x=y$. $d(x,y) = d(y,x)$. $d(x,y) \leq d(x,z) + d(z,y)$. Similarly (and ...
23
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12answers
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Classic applications of Baire category theorem

I've seen Baire category theorem used to prove existence of objects with certain properties. But it seems there is another class of interesting applications of Baire category theorem that I have yet ...
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4answers
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Can you write $\mathbb R^2$ as a disjoint union of two totally disconnected sets?

Can you write $\mathbb R^2$ as a disjoint union of two totally disconnected sets?
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2answers
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How do you axiomatize topology via nets?

Let $X$ be a set and let ${\mathcal N}$ be a collection of nets on $X.$ I've been told by several different people that ${\mathcal N}$ is the collection of convergent nets on $X$ with respect to some ...
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1answer
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Is there a topological space X homeomorphic to the space of continuous functions from X to [0, 1]?

In general, we might ask when we can find interesting spaces $X, Y$ such that $X$ is homeomorphic to $[X, Y]$. By the Lawvere fixed point theorem $Y$ must have the fixed point property. Happily, $Y = [...
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6answers
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Topology on the set of analytic functions

Let $H(D)$ be the set of all analytic functions in a region $D$ in $C$ or in $C^n$. Everyone who worked with this set knows that there is only one reasonable topology on it: the uniform convergence on ...
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1answer
737 views

Is the Golomb countable connected space topologically rigid?

The Golomb space $\mathbb G$ is the set of positive integers endowed with the topology generated by the base consisting of the arithmetic progressions $a+b\mathbb N_0$ with relatively prime $a,b$ and $...
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3answers
661 views

What sets of self-maps are the continuous self-maps under some topology?

An open question on MSE, https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/427634/a-topology-such-that-the-continuous-functions-are-exactly-the-polynomials , asks whether there is an infinite field and a ...
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1answer
558 views

Which ordered fields are homeomorphic to their power?

It is well known that $\mathbb{R}^2\ncong \mathbb{R}$. It is also known that $\mathbb{Q}^2\cong \mathbb{Q}$. It is a corollary to Sierpiński's theorem which states that every countable metric space ...
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8answers
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Connections between ultrafilters in topology and logic

I have a some-what vague question. It seems to me that there are two main ways in which ultrafilters (on a set) can be used. One is in topology. The notion of an ultrafilter converging to a point is ...
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4answers
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The role of ANR in modern topology

Absolute neighborhood retracts (ANRs) are topological spaces $X$ which, whenever $i\colon X\to Y$ is an embedding into a normal topological space $Y$, there exists a neighborhood $U$ of $i(X)$ in $Y$ ...
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2answers
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Is every closed set of Q² the intersection of some connected closed set of R² with Q²

Let $F\subset\mathbb{Q}^2$ a closed set. Does there exists some closed and connected set $G\subset\mathbb{R}^2$ such that $F=G\cap\mathbb{Q}^2$? For example if $F=\{a,b\}$, you can take $G$ the ...
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2answers
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Which are the rigid suborders of the real line?

Which are the rigid suborders of the real line? If A is any set of reals, then it can be viewed as an order structure itself under the induced order (A,<). The question is, when is this structure ...
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3answers
866 views

Possible categorical reformulation for the usual definition of compactness

Let $X$ be a compact topological space, $f_i:Y_i\to X$ a family of continuous maps such that the topology on $X$ is final for it (i.e., $U\subset X$ is open iff $f_i^{-1}(U)$ is open for each $i$, for ...
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4answers
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Spaces with no topological monoid structure which are homotopy equivalent to topological monoids

In motivating $A_\infty$-spaces to my students I'm going to insist on the homotopy invariance of the notion, saying that "being $A_\infty$ is the homotopy invariant version of being a topological ...
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6answers
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Is there a topological description of combinatorial Euler characteristic?

There are a collection of definitions of "combinatorial Euler characteristic", which is different from the "homotopy Euler characteristic". I will describe a few of them and give some references, and ...
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4answers
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When does a Galois connection induce a topology?

Let $(X,\leq)$ and $(Y,\leq)$ by partially ordered sets. Recall that a(n antitone) Galois connection between $X$ and $Y$ is a pair of order-reversing maps $\Phi: X \rightarrow Y, \ \Psi: Y \...
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2answers
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CW complexes and paracompactness

It seems like when we assume "niceness" in homotopy theory we assume that $X$ has the homotopy type of a CW complex, and in fiber bundle theory we assume that $X$ is paracompact. How do these two ...