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Questions tagged [divisors-multiples]

For questions on divisors and multiples, mainly but not exclusively of integers, and related and derived notions such as sums of divisors, perfect numbers and so on.

2
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1answer
399 views

On comparing two almost injective divisor maps

Edit 2018.08.08 This answer https://mathoverflow.net/a/307881 will be updated to give recent information about S, especially a forthcoming preprint. End Edit 2018.08.08 In an introductory post on ...
3
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1answer
292 views

Primitive sequence $a_i$ attaining Pillai's bound on $\sum_{i} 1/a_i$

A primitive sequence $1<a_1<\ldots<a_k\leq n$ is a sequence of integers no one of which divides any other, investigated by Erdos, Behrend and others, over the last 80 years. In fact, $\max k=\...
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6answers
1k views

Getting a bound on the coefficients of the factor polynomial

Suppose $f(x):=a_0+a_1x+\cdots+a_nx^n$ is a polynomial in $\mathbb{Z}[x]$ and $|a_i|\leq M$ for each $i=0,\ldots ,n.$ Now suppose $g(x)$ is a factor of $f(x)$ in $\mathbb{Z}[x]$, then is it possible ...
1
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1answer
705 views

Is there a formula that can predict the primes in the sequence of ratios of consecutive superior highly composite numbers? : $2, 3, 2, 5, 2, 3, 7,…$

This is the sequence of prime numbers which are the elementary building blocks for the superior highly composite numbers: $2, 3, 2, 5, 2, 3, 7, 2, 11, 13, 2, 3, 5, 17, 19, 2, 23, ...$ The $n^{th}$ ...
49
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4answers
4k views

Strange (or stupid) arithmetic derivation

Let us consider the following operation on positive integers: $$n=\prod_{i=1}^{k}p_i^{\alpha_i} \qquad f(n):= \prod_{i=1}^{k}\alpha_ip_i^{\alpha_i-1}$$ (Is it true that if we apply this operation to ...
4
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0answers
580 views

The Grimm Machine(s): A Collatz Conjecture Rival?

Edit 2018.08.08 This answer https://mathoverflow.net/a/307881 will be updated to give recent information about S, especially a forthcoming preprint. End Edit 2018.08.08 Just as the Collatz ...
1
vote
1answer
374 views

There at least 4 divisors of $n-1$ which do not divide $\phi(n)$ if $n$ is a composite of the form $6k+1$

If $n$ is composite then $\phi(n) < n-1$ (Euler's totient function) hence there must be one or more divisors of $n-1$ which do not divide $\phi(n)$. For lack of a better terminology, let us call ...
1
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1answer
283 views

Does there exist an integer that is both solitary and almost perfect?

This question is an offshoot from the following MSE post. I hope that it is appropriate for this site. Let $\sigma(x)$ be the sum of the divisors of $x$. An integer $a$ is said to be solitary if ...
8
votes
1answer
293 views

Sum of divisors below threshold

Let $\sigma(n)$ denote the sum of divisors of $n$, that is, $$ \sigma(n) = \sum_{d | n} d. $$ It is known that $\sigma$ can have values as large as order $n \log \log n$. However, obviously the sum is ...
7
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0answers
451 views

When is $ \sigma(n!-1) $ a perfect square?

I am looking for pairs of positive integers $(m,n)$ such that $ \sigma(n!-1) =m^2$, where $\sigma$ is the sum of divisors function. Examples occur with $(m,n)=(12,5),(1,2)$. Question: Are there ...
6
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1answer
234 views

Large gaps between consecutive irreducible polynomials with small heights

For a prime gap of length at least $n$, a trivial upper bound for its first occurrence is $N=n!$ or $N=lcm(2,\dots,n)$. A bit better is $N=p_1\cdots p_n$ where $p_k$ is the $k$th prime, as then $N+2,\...
3
votes
1answer
286 views

Problem related to Frobenius coin problem

Let's say that the linear form $ax+by$ represents $n$ if $ax+by=n$ for some positive integer $x$ and $y$. Call a pair $(a,b)\in\Bbb N\times\Bbb N$ with $\mathsf{gcd}(a,b)=1$ good if, for any $r,s,u,...
1
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1answer
449 views

Some divisibility constraints in Frobenius coin problem

Let's say that the linear form $ax+by$ represents $n$ if $ax+by=n$ for some positive integer $x$ and $y$. Call a pair $(a,b)\in\Bbb N\times\Bbb N$ with $\mathsf{gcd}(a,b)=1$ excellent if linear form ...