16
$\begingroup$

Peter Freyd is a great category theorist. His PhD dissertation, Functor Theory, dates from Princeton in 1960. It's cited as [14] in Mitchell's book Theory of categories. In fact, Google scholar says it's been cited 44 times. Yet, I cannot find a copy of it online. The nLab links to many theses of category theorists from that era, but does not have a link for Freyd's thesis. Does anyone know if it's available online?

$\endgroup$
1
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I was in touch with Pam Freyd (Peter's wife) by email last year. She said that somebody had trashed Peter's computer, so he no longer uses them. I'm not going to publish her email address, but those who need it can contact me privately. $\endgroup$ Feb 22 at 22:58

2 Answers 2

20
$\begingroup$

A PDF of Freyd's 1960 thesis Functor Theory is available in the Category Theory Archive.

$\endgroup$
2
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Thanks! I went ahead and updated the nLab to link to that. My first ever nLab edit. $\endgroup$ Feb 22 at 20:09
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @David bravo! Not so bad, was it? $\endgroup$
    – David Roberts
    Feb 22 at 21:11
8
$\begingroup$

It's on ProQuest at this address: https://www.proquest.com/docview/301870996

$\endgroup$
12
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I guess the more general point is that a lot of theses are on ProQuest. No, I don't like their business model either. $\endgroup$ Feb 23 at 0:21
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Yes, after your answer, I went looking for other MO questions of the form "where can I find X's thesis" and answered one. And, I updated the nLab with several I found on ProQuest. So, thanks again! $\endgroup$ Feb 23 at 0:22
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ My thesis is on there. I've received zero, even though it's been cited many times. But, that's also standard for math, right? I don't get money from my papers in JPAA either. $\endgroup$ Feb 23 at 0:27
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I mean, I guess you could write books. But, I wrote a book, and make like $200 a year from it. Certainly not enough to be worth the effort. I guess you could turn your research powers to a purpose that rewards with money, but at that point why stay in academia? I think we get plenty of other rewards from doing research, and changing the model to pay authors for access to their papers might do more harm than good. Just my two cents. $\endgroup$ Feb 23 at 0:32
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ I do write books. In fact, one of them makes almost enough money to pay minimum wage for the time I spent writing it. It's about maths and music. I have no clue why music is more popular than representation theory, but there you go. $\endgroup$ Feb 23 at 0:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.