I am aware of a few interesting math podcasts but haven’t come across any interesting advanced math audiobook. Are there some?

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    I haven't come across any, but there should be. It reminds me of Pontryagin, who did amazing work in topology despite being blind. Also, I seem to recall Euler went blind at some point in life. Audiobooks would not be a bad idea! – David White Jun 12 at 1:46
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    Good luck finding an audio book that involves commutative diagrams. – KConrad Jun 12 at 2:02
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    @DavidWhite those are two very big names. I think maths communication is very attached to classic methods. Probably it will have to evolve a lot before useful advanced audiobooks are produced, I guess. – Fernando Muro Jun 12 at 7:59
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    A long time ago I had a blind student who had set up his laptop to read raw LaTeX code to him, at very high speed. Lecturers would give him LaTeX copies of their notes, and he would also type his own notes in LaTeX. Something like that probably works much better than standard audio for a blind person who is serious about mathematics, although it requires a large initial effort. – Neil Strickland Jun 12 at 10:46
  • @KConrad, that reminds me of an audiobook I heard, mostly pop sci quantum mechanics, but with a few equations thrown in. The pop sci was interesting enough that I managed, but with some anguish, to sit through the narrator saying "delta times v divided by delta times t …". – LSpice Jun 12 at 11:21

The Great Courses has a selection of video courses that include graduate level mathematics, for example this course on Discrete Mathematics or this one on differential equations, or one on number theory. These are audio+video, but you might still be able to get useful information out if you only listen to the audio.

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