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Is there a C/C++ library for Number Theory that helps generate a Strong PseudoPrimes w.r.t. an Input base.

I intend to test a Primality Testing Algorithm's performace stastically but I am struggling with a dataset of Strong PseudoPrimes and was unable to find one of Random Strong PseudoPrimes large enough.

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I'm guessing you will want to be working with numbers larger than 64-bits, and so you probably want GMP (see this page). This library is used by much of the software that number theorists use. (Magma uses parts of it, and PARI/GP uses it too.)

Note that GMP has a built-in function that tests primality by running several Miller-Rabin tests. It doesn't have a function that allows you to specify the input base, but that could be easily created by copying part of the source code.

Finally, note that the website factordb.com maintains a list of numbers that pass a surprisingly large number of iterations of the Miller-Rabin test before failing one. This list might be useful to you, and Arnault (in "Constructing Carmichael Numbers Which are Strong Pseudoprimes to Several Bases") gave an example of a 397-digit composite number for which the smallest strong liar is is $307$.

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  • $\begingroup$ Prof. I am still struggling with the approach to generate large Strong Pseudoprimes. The way I am doing is: 1. Generate a random odd number 2. Test if its a strong Pseudoprime wrt. input base 3. If not keep incrementing it by 2 till we get a Strong PseudoPrime. 4. Repeat the process to get another Strong PseudoPrime. This is highly impractical to say the least as the numbers can be far apart. Is there a short cut I am missing ? $\endgroup$ – TheoryQuest1 Sep 16 '16 at 15:47
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    $\begingroup$ It is quite likely that there is a short cut. If you only want spsp's for one base $a$, you could look for composite factors of $\Phi_{n}(a)$ that are relatively prime to $n$ (where $n$ is odd and $\Phi_{n}(x)$ is the $n$th cyclotomic polynomial). For example, $N = 407613774637837876811$ is an spsp to base 3 because it is a composite factor of $\Phi_{65}(3)$. $\endgroup$ – Jeremy Rouse Sep 16 '16 at 17:26
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    $\begingroup$ If you want multiple bases, you could search for $n = p(2p-1)$ where $p \equiv 3 \pmod{4}$ is prime and $2p-1$ is also prime. For such an $n$, one quarter of the bases $a$ will be strong liars, so your chances are good. $\endgroup$ – Jeremy Rouse Sep 16 '16 at 17:28
  • $\begingroup$ much thanks Prof. I got the second one. The first i have to get some background (my major is CS). $\endgroup$ – TheoryQuest1 Sep 16 '16 at 17:54

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