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I'm writing a paper for real analysis seminar, a paper about Banach-Zarecki theorem and I need some information about the authors.

Stefan Banach - there is no problem to find information about him.

What about Zarecki? I only found that he was russian mathematician, and in "Theory of functions of a real variable" Natanson writes "M. A. Zarecki". This is all I know - I cannot find any information about this mathematician or his life.

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    $\begingroup$ Moisej Abramovitch Zaretsky (1903-1930) --- his short life explains likely why so little of him is known. $\endgroup$ – Carlo Beenakker Feb 12 '15 at 13:52
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Here's an excerpt from Integration and Modern Analysis by Benedetto and Czaja (pp. 202-203):

Moisej A. Zaretsky (1903–1930) is not a household name in mathematics, which is why we feature him now because of his beautiful result, independent of Banach, of the Banach–Zaretsky theorem (1925) (Theorem 4.6.2). Zaretsky was a Russian, and he died in the Caucasian resort of Batumi. The English translation of the Russian Isidor P. Natanson’s text uses the spelling “Zarecki”

As a matter of fact, Zarecki is a Polish transliteration of his name -- most likely it was used by Banach and his group.

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    $\begingroup$ I guess he was born into a Jewish family living in the Pale of Settlement (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pale_of_Settlement), it might have well been Poland... $\endgroup$ – Dima Pasechnik Feb 12 '15 at 20:20
  • $\begingroup$ If you define 1900s Poland by its territory before partitioning it by Russia, Prussia and Austria then it is more than likely. $\endgroup$ – Tomek Kania Feb 12 '15 at 22:13
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You get more results searching under a different transliteration: "Moisej A. Zaretsky".

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