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It's excellent news that the LMS are to re-publish Cassels & Fröhlich. There are many other excellent mathematics books which are just about impossible (or at least very expensive) to get hold of, though this problem seems to be getting a bit better with some texts being printed on demand.

Which book(s) would you most like to see re-published?

A couple of comments:

Perhaps nobody under 30 actually reads real books made from trees any more, but personally I find it more convenient to refer to a paper copy, to the extent that I will happily buy a copy of something which is available free on-line (like SGA 1 and 2, or Milne's Arithmetic Duality Theorems).

And of course there can be legal issues with re-publishing works - EGA & SGA seem to be a case in point at the moment.

Here are two to start off with:

  • Manin, Cubic forms
  • Grothendieck et al., Dix exposés sur la cohomologie des schémas

(not including Cassels & Fröhlich because I picked up a copy on Amazon a couple of years ago :-) )

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    $\begingroup$ Is this a questionaire by booksellers. $\endgroup$ – Sunni Mar 15 '10 at 14:50
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    $\begingroup$ If there are any reading, maybe they will take note... $\endgroup$ – Martin Bright Mar 15 '10 at 14:59
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    $\begingroup$ Reprints in Theory and Applications of Categories (tac.mta.ca/tac/reprints) makes it its business to reprint out-of-print books in category theory. At least five books, plus a bunch of classic but hard-to-get-hold-of papers, have appeared so far. If you have suggestions, contact me or another editor. $\endgroup$ – Tom Leinster Mar 15 '10 at 15:26
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    $\begingroup$ I was going to say Grunbaum & Shephard, Tilings and Patterns, but it turns out it's being re-issued---in paperback, no less---later this year. I love dover books. $\endgroup$ – Leah Wrenn Berman Mar 15 '10 at 20:10
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    $\begingroup$ Uh,I beg to differ,Jonas. Young students are starting to burn out thier eyes and get migraines reading too much from a quartz screen.So they're starting to not only go back to paper books,but requesting titles from wise old self-studiers like me. Sometimes low-tech is good. $\endgroup$ – The Mathemagician Mar 18 '10 at 18:39

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Would also like to suggest to the list "Local Class Field Theory" by Iwasawa.

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Differential Galois Theory by J.-F. Pommaret.

This is the first book on nonlinear differential Galois theory. (Second hand copies only seem to be available at ridiculous prices.)

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Philip F Reichmeider, The Equivalence of Some Combinatorial Matching Theorems. A fine little book about Hall's Marriage Theorem, Konig's Theorem, Dilworth's Theorem, Ford-Fulkerson, and so on, and the relations among them.

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Sieradski's 'An Introduction to Topology and Homotopy' is my favorite introduction to the subject.

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For a long time, I wished the Hungarian translation of Knuth's The Art of Computer Programming volumes 1-3 would be reprinted. I got lucky and I now have a used copy, but I guess it might still help others.

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Complex Analysis, by E.T. Copson. Very beautiful book on a beautiful subject. Sad that it is out of print.

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The three volume of “Connections, Curvature and Cohomology”

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The algebra of random variables by Melvin Dale Springer (Wiley series in probability and mathematical statistics) in 1979 is on offer used at amazon.com for prices starting at about 500$ ...

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