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Let $G$ be the semidirect product of $\mathbb{Z}^2$ with $\mathbb{Z}/6$ where $\mathbb{Z}/6$ acts by the order 6 element of $SL_2(\mathbb{Z})$. We can think of this group as the group of order preserving isometries of the tesselation of $\mathbb{R^2}$ with regular triangles.

Does this group acts properly, isometrically and cocompactly on a median space??

Let for two points in a metric space $[x,y]=\{z|d(x,z)+d(z,y)=d(x,y)\}$. If $X$ is a geodesic metric space than this is just the set of all points lying on some geodesic from $x$ to $y$. $X$ is called a median space if for every triple of points $x,y,z$ we have that $[x,y]\cap[x,z]\cap[y,z]$ consists of exactly one point - the median of $x,y,z$. Examples for median spaces are trees and $\mathbb{R}^n$ with the $l^1$- metric.

The motivation is that the one skeleton of a CAT(0) cube complex is a median graph. If a group acts geometrically on this CAT(0)-cube complex it also acts that way on that graph. For example this group acts properly and isometrically on $\mathbb{R}^3$. This gives a proper and isometric action on a median space, but this action is not cocompact. So I was wondering whether there is a better action. The problem seems to be that the automorphism of $\mathbb{Z}^2$ does not extend to a cube-complex automorphism of $\mathbb{R}^2$, but I could not make this precise.

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  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps you could remind us of the definition of a median space? $\endgroup$ – HJRW Dec 10 '12 at 13:07
  • $\begingroup$ @Joseph: you just gave the definition of a geodesic median space . A median space (as given by Henrik) does not require geodesics. He just mentions what is $[x,y]$ is in case the metric space is geodesic. $\endgroup$ – YCor Dec 10 '12 at 16:34
  • $\begingroup$ @Yves: I've deleted my comment now that Henrik has defined "median space." $\endgroup$ – Joseph O'Rourke Dec 10 '12 at 22:29

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