14 events
when toggle format what by license comment
S Jan 3 '17 at 5:48 history suggested Takahiro Waki CC BY-SA 3.0
not Barry Mazur. emphasis.
Jan 3 '17 at 4:34 review Suggested edits
S Jan 3 '17 at 5:48
Feb 7 '15 at 14:28 answer Alexandre Eremenko timeline score: 7
Feb 7 '15 at 14:00 answer Joseph O'Rourke timeline score: 2
Feb 7 '15 at 11:59 answer Aaron Meyerowitz timeline score: 2
Feb 7 '15 at 4:36 comment added Joseph O'Rourke @JoelReyesNoche: Yes, that's what I meant. Nice examples!
Feb 7 '15 at 4:13 comment added Joel Reyes Noche If the answer to my above question is yes, then isosceles triangles also have simple periodic paths. Start perpendicular to one of the two equal sides then go toward the midpoint of the third side.
Feb 7 '15 at 3:46 comment added Joel Reyes Noche When you say simple path does that include the case where the path can go back over itself? If so, then a right triangle has a simple periodic path. (math.brown.edu/~res/Papers/billiards1.pdf)
Feb 7 '15 at 3:17 comment added Noam D. Elkies "Might every regular polygon have a simple periodic path?" is too narrowly specific, with an easy affirmative answer: such a path (also a regular polygon of the same order) is obtained by joining midpoints of consecutive pairs of sides.
Feb 7 '15 at 1:57 history edited Joseph O'Rourke CC BY-SA 3.0
added 85 characters in body
Feb 7 '15 at 1:44 comment added Noam D. Elkies For starters a rectangle has infinitely many simple periodic paths.
Feb 7 '15 at 1:34 history edited Joseph O'Rourke CC BY-SA 3.0
edited body
Feb 7 '15 at 1:32 comment added Andy Putman It's "Masur", not "Mazur"...
Feb 7 '15 at 1:24 history asked Joseph O'Rourke CC BY-SA 3.0