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20h
comment A combinatorial and number theoretical problem
It is not clear exactly what are you seeking: the number of ways will definitely depend on the specific choice of your numbers. You should restate your question and ask it at an appropriate site, like MathStackExchange.
Nov
11
answered Existence of arithmetic function satisfying a certain property
Nov
11
revised Is ${\rm lcm}\{{\rm ord}_p(q)\colon q\mid p-1,\ q>2\}>\sqrt p\ \,$?
added 70 characters in body; edited title
Nov
10
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
10
asked Is ${\rm lcm}\{{\rm ord}_p(q)\colon q\mid p-1,\ q>2\}>\sqrt p\ \,$?
Nov
9
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
29
comment Why $\gcd \{ {\rm ord}_p(q)\colon q\mid p-1 \}$ likes to be large?
Thanks, Lucia, your remark is quite insightful (though it seems difficult to prove anything along these lines).
Oct
29
revised Why $\gcd \{ {\rm ord}_p(q)\colon q\mid p-1 \}$ likes to be large?
(Some) typos fixed
Oct
29
asked Why $\gcd \{ {\rm ord}_p(q)\colon q\mid p-1 \}$ likes to be large?
Oct
13
comment Does $\binom{2n}{n} \equiv 2 \pmod p$ ever hold?
@BenjaminDickman: Thanks for reminding me about mathoverflow.net/a/165441/22971; I will check how relevant it is.
Oct
10
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
10
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
10
comment Does $\binom{2n}{n} \equiv 2 \pmod p$ ever hold?
@The Masked Avenger: I've just made the computation - nothing to write home about. (I have troubles fitting the results into this comment, but they are absolutely non-illuminating, anyway.)
Oct
10
comment Does $\binom{2n}{n} \equiv 2 \pmod p$ ever hold?
@Felipe: having thought for a little while, I don't see any immediate relation. It has to do with $y^{2(n-1)}-x^{2(n-1)}$ being quadratic residues though.
Oct
10
asked Does $\binom{2n}{n} \equiv 2 \pmod p$ ever hold?
Oct
10
awarded  Yearling
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
26
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
26
comment List of integers without any arithmetic progression of n terms
@Timothy: my wild guess is that considering progressions with just two carefully chosen differences ($n$ and $n-1$?) may suffice. I think the first step would be to verify this numerically.