38 reputation
4
bio website
location Kolkata
age 40
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Mar 13 '11 at 12:05
I have interest in both Pure Mathematics and Computer Science. The interplay between mathematics and computer science fascinates me. I love to solve real life computer science problems, and if that challenges me mathematically then its a pleasure for me to delve deep into that.

Oct
18
comment A mapping from a lattice to itself
I haven't understood the 3rd line of your comment. Whats the definition of e and how "93 is not a power of 2" applies here to conclude that answer may be infinity.
Oct
18
comment A mapping from a lattice to itself
I don't think for any $a \in Z$, and for $a > 1$, the relation $a^{3} = a^{2} + a + 1$ holds. Can you provide a real example in support of your claim.
Oct
1
answered A mapping from a lattice to itself
Sep
30
comment A mapping from a lattice to itself
Answer to the first question is not at all infinity. For example, take $n = 2$.$S_{1}$ is then the set of points with $a_1 = a_2$. The other points of $Z^{2} - {0}$ are in $S_{2}$. And $S_{i}$ for $i >= 3$ is empty. So answer here is 2. Infact, for $n = 2$ this holds for $\mathbb Q$ and $\mathbb R$.
Sep
29
comment A mapping from a lattice to itself
Whats the notion of homogenity in algebraic geometry then. Can you please elaborate a bit.
Sep
29
answered practical applications of eigenvalues and eigenvectors
Sep
29
awarded  Teacher
Sep
29
comment A mapping from a lattice to itself
Yes $Z$ is the set of integers. Each $a_{j} \in Z$ for all $j = 1,2, \ldots, n.$ The earlier paper, I referred is the following. A number-theoretic game Prithvi Ramesh Published in Resonance, January 2003, P.84-88
Sep
29
comment A mapping from a lattice to itself
They mean absolute values.
Sep
29
revised A mapping from a lattice to itself
Changing math formatting
Sep
29
asked A mapping from a lattice to itself
Sep
29
answered Ingenuity in mathematics
Sep
29
awarded  Scholar
Sep
29
accepted How to study the behavior of a particular function on a Vector Space.
Sep
28
awarded  Editor
Sep
28
awarded  Student
Sep
28
comment How to study the behavior of a particular function on a Vector Space.
$X = K'^{n}$, where $K'$ is a field and $K \subset K'$. This can also be the case. Now, you talked about an equivalence relation, one question is if $K'$ is a finite field, then can it be possible to enumerate all the equivalence classes, or the number of equivalence classes.
Sep
28
revised How to study the behavior of a particular function on a Vector Space.
New Tag added
Sep
28
comment How to study the behavior of a particular function on a Vector Space.
If $X = (x_1, x_2, \ldots, x_n)$, then $k + X = (k + x_1, k_ + x_2, \ldots, k + x_n)$.
Sep
28
asked How to study the behavior of a particular function on a Vector Space.