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location sqrt(-1)
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visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen 1 hour ago

 
  two queens
 
 
    mathematics and death
    not cheerful not sad
    guide me through the land
    pat me on my head
 
    they live
    in my one man nation
    i follow them
    to my destination
 
 
wh,
(long ago)



  polynomials over finite Galois field
  spread so evenly across their finite affine space
  i wish for a network of friends
  to count on


wh,
1996-03-05/06



10h
comment Painting $n$ balls from $2n$ balls red, and guessing which ball is red, game
@Irvan, thank you. I would rewrite (edit) the question. However people seem to understand it, and even myself I do (perhaps :-).
10h
comment Painting $n$ balls from $2n$ balls red, and guessing which ball is red, game
Would you mind substituting Adam for Alice? This introducing a male (in addition to a female) would induce SHE and HE (instead of she and she).
10h
comment Is the parallelogram rule an axiom or a theorem in euclidean geometry?
When you, @shooting-squirrel, wake up, would you mind tell me what the parallelogram rule is?
11h
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How many different rectangles (in terms of area) can fit in a 20-unit-wide square?
12h
accepted Who defined and who coined “module”?
1d
comment Intuition behind $\zeta(2) = \frac{\pi^2}{6}$
@Alex, just after (not before :-) I posted the above quote from JvN, I searched for it. <a href="en.wikiquote.org/wiki/John_von_Neumann">Wikiquote</…; provides the following version: Young man, in mathematics you don't understand things. You just get used to them. And indeed, Alex, the quote is followed by this note: Reply to Dr. Felix T. Smith at Stanford Research Institute who had said "I'm afraid I don't understand the method of characteristics.".
1d
comment Intuition behind $\zeta(2) = \frac{\pi^2}{6}$
John von Neumann said something like this: young man, you don't understand (things) in mathematics, you get used to (them).
1d
comment Intuition behind $\zeta(2) = \frac{\pi^2}{6}$
@Dal, you don't need intuition, you need Euler.
1d
comment Splitting integers 1, 2, 3, … n to avoid least possible sum
A lazy introduction to the topic: $\ \forall_n\ 2\cdot n<g(n)\le 1+\frac{(3\cdot n+1)\cdot n}2.\ $ Corollary: $\ g(1)=3.\ $ (Am I right?).
1d
revised What should be considered a finite size of an infinite dimensional space?
extras
1d
revised What should be considered a finite size of an infinite dimensional space?
typos
1d
answered What should be considered a finite size of an infinite dimensional space?
2d
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Convergence on a random graph
2d
accepted A simple language and systematic computations
2d
accepted Prime divisors of the respectively minimal binomial coefficients
2d
revised Which univariate function satisfies $e^{g(x)} + e^{-g(x)} = \alpha x$ for $x>0$ and some constant $\alpha>0$?
A possible real question
2d
comment Which univariate function satisfies $e^{g(x)} + e^{-g(x)} = \alpha x$ for $x>0$ and some constant $\alpha>0$?
This must be one of the top 10 Questions which belong to: does not appear to be about. Suggestion: consider $\ e^y+e^{-y}.\ $ Good luck.
Oct
20
comment The limit of edge-midpoint convex polyhedra
Construction from the point 2 (bullet) $\ P\subset\cap_{n=1}^\infty P_n\subset P_1\ $ is a very nice idea. On the other hand I don't understand point 1. By taking all midpoints you're getting $\ P_1\ $ back, i.e. by iterating we get $\ P_1\ P_1\ P_1\ \ldots\ $-- and this is not a typo. I must be missing something.
Oct
20
revised The limit of edge-midpoint convex polyhedra
typo
Oct
20
comment A proof from Lang's undergraduate analysis
Hush-hush, don't use word undergraduate around here.