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location Lancaster, United Kingdom
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visits member for 5 years
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Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in


15h
comment Obscure Names in Mathematics
Oh come on - if we are going to add theorems named after the wrong people then we will be here all day...
15h
comment Zero-mean assumptions concerning r.d.'s when reading graduate-level probability texts
Does applying the mean-zero case to $X-{\bf E}X$ not answer this?
1d
reviewed Close Geometrically connected curve
1d
comment Geometrically connected curve
This question appears to be off-topic because it is solved by using a search engine
1d
reviewed Close state of art pseudo-boolean optimization solver
1d
comment Intuition behind $\zeta(2) = \frac{\pi^2}{6}$
Not everything in maths can be justified by a reason that feels "intuitive", and "intuition" is highly subjective
1d
reviewed Close Conformal map from a sector of unit disk onto upper half plane
1d
reviewed Close How to prove that the vertices of a convex hull are only defined by some specific subsets, in this particular case
1d
reviewed Close What should be considered a finite size of an infinite dimensional space?
1d
comment What should be considered a finite size of an infinite dimensional space?
I mean, isn't this all just Hilbert's hotel? I really think that it would be more fruitful to give the actual problem you're thinking about, and then we can see if there are some finitely generated or finite-dimensional objects lurking in the problem that allow one to employ some kind of size argument
1d
comment What should be considered a finite size of an infinite dimensional space?
Michael, the point of my example is that the map P does have a natural inverse
1d
comment What should be considered a finite size of an infinite dimensional space?
For instance, let me take the integration map $P: A \to B$ where $A$ is the space of continuous functions $[0,1]\to {\bf R}$ that vanish at $0$, and $B$ is the space of $C^1$-functions $[0,1]\to {\bf R}$ that vanish at $0$. Now should one think $A$ is larger than $B$ or is "just as big" as $B$?
1d
comment What should be considered a finite size of an infinite dimensional space?
The question in your title is potentially interesting but very broad, but without further details about your original problem it is hard to see why one has any hope that cardinality or 'measure' arguments might be relevant
2d
reviewed Leave Open A probability application question
2d
reviewed Leave Open The behavior of series involving special subsets of the prime numbers
2d
reviewed Reject suggested edit on When is fiber dimension upper semi-continuous?
2d
reviewed Leave Closed Which univariate function satisfies $e^{g(x)} + e^{-g(x)} = \alpha x$ for $x>0$ and some constant $\alpha>0$?
2d
comment Which univariate function satisfies $e^{g(x)} + e^{-g(x)} = \alpha x$ for $x>0$ and some constant $\alpha>0$?
It seems to me that you would do better not to presume to read the minds and guess the abilities of people who vote to close.
Oct
19
comment Representations of the two dimensional non-abelian Lie algebra
It is strange that he doesn't explicitly mention the smallest solvable non-abelian Lie algebra, though
Oct
18
comment When is the group algebra $L^1(G)$ semisimple?
Unless you have misquoted Folland?