10,269 reputation
14671
bio website vmm.math.uci.edu
location Univ. of California at Irvine
age 83
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Aug 23 at 20:39
I'm a Professor at UC Irvine, but spent most of my career at Brandeis. My research areas: Differential Topology, Transformation Groups, and Global Analysis. Recently I developed a math visualization program, 3D-XplorMath, freely available at http://3D-XplorMath.org) and a companion website, the Virtual Math Museum at http://VirtualMathMuseum.org. Last year I co-authored a differential equations text with my son Bob, most of which is downloadable from http://ode-math.com .

Jun
25
awarded  dg.differential-geometry
Jun
25
awarded  Revival
Jun
25
awarded  Pundit
Jun
14
answered Calculus book in the spirit of the 18th century
Jun
9
answered Mathematics for ebook readers
May
31
awarded  Popular Question
May
30
comment A Canonical Form Theorem for $n$-forms?
@Francesco YES ! I don't think you are missing anything---that is essentially the same proof as mine. I'll have to get Kobayashi's book from the library and have a look. Many thanks for this clue.
May
30
comment A Canonical Form Theorem for $n$-forms?
@Mariano. Right, that is the way I think of it, and it was Darboux Theorem that made me think it might be true.
May
30
asked A Canonical Form Theorem for $n$-forms?
May
24
awarded  Notable Question
May
24
awarded  Nice Answer
May
22
comment Why don't more mathematicians improve Wikipedia articles?
@Mark M YES! That is a very good approximation of what I was asking for. Thanks for telling me about it. It is now one of my "pinned" tabs and I will try to help with the project.
May
22
answered Why don't more mathematicians improve Wikipedia articles?
May
17
comment Are there proofs that you feel you did not “understand” for a long time?
How about the proof that Einstein is said to have (re)discovered as a teen-ager? It is clear that the areas of similar right triangles is proportional to the squares of corresponding sides---in particular to the squares of their hypotenuses. Dropping a perpendicular from the vertex of the right triangle onto the hypotenuse c divides it into two similar triangles with hypotenuses a and b, hence: k*c^2 = k*a^2 + k*b^2 so c^2 = a^2 + b^2
May
10
awarded  Nice Answer
May
2
answered A simple and good reference about solitons
May
1
answered Does a *topological* manifold have an exhaustion by compact submanifolds with boundary?
Apr
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
26
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
20
awarded  Necromancer