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seen Aug 24 '11 at 17:41

Jan
11
answered What would you want to see at the Museum of Mathematics?
Jan
11
answered What would you want to see at the Museum of Mathematics?
Jan
11
comment What would you want to see at the Museum of Mathematics?
How about movies of kids solving math (or other practical geometry) problems cooperatively, in classrooms even. If you were a kid in a boring school, you might be very gratified to see how a good problem solving session in school might operate. If it were done in the math circle fashion, kids could be motivated to join something like them. They could be arranged by grade level, or you could choose easier or harder ones. Grown up mathematicians would only be one of a series. Come to think of it, math circle organizing could be a major activity of the museum, like glee clubs
Jan
11
comment What would you want to see at the Museum of Mathematics?
I suppose you could have "problem rooms", in which you see a problem and some false solutions, and then walk through to a room with hints, finally ascending to a room with a solution. Could be good for kids.
Jan
1
comment New Year's Predictions in Mathematics
No longer relevant? It's only 8pm here in NY. :-)
Dec
3
revised Ingenuity in mathematics
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Dec
3
revised Ingenuity in mathematics
added 763 characters in body; added 2 characters in body; deleted 11 characters in body
Dec
3
answered Ingenuity in mathematics
Nov
3
comment How many mathematicians are there?
See nsf.gov/pubs/1998/nsf9895/math.htm , according to which there were 10,000 highly active research mathematicians worldwide. 15k PhD level mathematicians in the US in 1996.
Oct
18
comment Awfully sophisticated proof for simple facts
As an aside, Titchmarsh argued the infinitude of the primes because zeta(1) is infinite on page 1 of his book.
Sep
24
comment Which mathematical ideas have done most to change history?
“Philosophy is written in this grand book—I mean the universe — which stands continually open to our gaze, but it cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language and interpret the characters in which it is written. It is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles, and other geometrical figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it; without these, one is wandering around in a dark labyrinth.” Galileo Galilei, Il Saggiatore (The Assayer, 1623)[1]
Sep
3
answered Demonstrating that rigour is important
Aug
29
asked What categorical mathematical structure(s) best describe the space of “localized events” in “relational quantum mechanics”?
Jul
15
comment Can you characterize the group of transformations of knot diagrams which preserve the knot embedding?
Thanks, I'll follow up and report back
Jul
15
accepted Can you characterize the group of transformations of knot diagrams which preserve the knot embedding?
Jul
14
accepted Assume the standard (better to switch) solution of the Monte Hall problem. Then there's the 3-card Monte problem
Jul
14
comment Assume the standard (better to switch) solution of the Monte Hall problem. Then there's the 3-card Monte problem
Just to make it perfectly unambiguous before I program the experiment, I take it that you also predict that the player has prob (win) = 1/2. Right?
Jul
12
comment Assume the standard (better to switch) solution of the Monte Hall problem. Then there's the 3-card Monte problem
Yes, by symmetry your answer must be right. However, until now I didn't quite realize just how important the loss of symmetry was in the original Monty Hall problem.
Jul
12
asked Assume the standard (better to switch) solution of the Monte Hall problem. Then there's the 3-card Monte problem
Jul
11
revised How can I conclude that I live in a solar system?
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