27,656 reputation
269153
bio website marksapir.wordpress.com
location Nashville, TN
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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Oct 9 '13 at 2:58
Professor of Mathematics at Vanderbilt University

Feb
19
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
8
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
4
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
16
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Question
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awarded  Popular Question
Oct
9
awarded  Caucus
Oct
9
awarded  Constituent
Sep
26
comment A question about finite groups (a weak version of the converse of Lagrange theorem)
@DerekHolt: You must be joking.
Sep
26
comment A question about finite groups (a weak version of the converse of Lagrange theorem)
@TobiasKildetoft: This is much simpler. The OP got this problem as a homework in his/her algebra class. He/she decided to post it here instead of doing the problem on his/her own. Since we do not know OP's home University and the name of the instructor, we cannot send a formal complain. So the OP is safe.
Sep
25
comment An analysis proof of the Hall marriage theorem
@GerryMyerson: The book is indeed nice.
Sep
23
revised Strange (or stupid) arithmetic derivation
edited body
Sep
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
22
revised Strange (or stupid) arithmetic derivation
added 402 characters in body
Sep
22
comment Strange (or stupid) arithmetic derivation
@DanielSoltész: In fact you are right: if you want to bound the number of different elements in a chain, then $p>n^{2^n-1}$ is enough. I accidentally answered a harder question about bounding a precycle. A reasonable (still open) question would be whether the lengths of all cycles are bounded.
Sep
22
comment Strange (or stupid) arithmetic derivation
The difference is that you want to bound the number of different elements in a chain, that is the sum of the length of the pre-cycle and the length of the cycle. My answer shows that already the length of the pre-cycle is unbounded. As far as finding a concrete bound for $p$, I do not see how your definition helps.
Sep
22
comment Strange (or stupid) arithmetic derivation
@DanielSoltész: These are equivalent definitions as far as your question is concerned.