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Dec
8
comment Propositions equivalent to the completeness of the real numbers
That's right. ​ ​
Dec
3
comment Propositions equivalent to the completeness of the real numbers
mathoverflow.net/a/33032/5810 ​ ​
Nov
13
revised Proving Richardson's theorem for constants
mentioned Eric's response
Nov
12
comment Is the game Hanabi NEXPTIME-complete?
@domotorp : $\:$ "the best option" will also depend on what the other player does. $\;\;\;\;$
Nov
12
comment Is the game Hanabi NEXPTIME-complete?
@domotorp : $\:$ "going through all combinations in a brute force search and computing probabilities $\hspace{.51 in}$ in PSPACE" and then doing what with those probabilities? $\;\;\;\;$
Nov
12
asked Proving Richardson's theorem for constants
Nov
12
comment Pursuit-Evasion type game on graph (“Flyswatter game”)
Yes, that ought to be true. ​ ​ ​ Another modifications one could make is considering the discounted version, in which [a real number r such that ​ 0 < r < 1 ] ​ is given and if the swatter hits the fly at time t then the swatter scores $r^{\hspace{.02 in}t}$ else the swatter scores 0. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
Nov
12
answered Pursuit-Evasion type game on graph (“Flyswatter game”)
Nov
11
comment Pursuit-Evasion type game on graph (“Flyswatter game”)
@DavidSpeyer : $\;\;\;$ Your calculation only works when the swatter has no information about $q_n$, but in your strategy, $q_{n-1}$ gives the swatter information about $q_n$. $\:$ Furthermore, I found a strategy for the swatter that wins with probability greater than 1/3 on all cycles. $\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;$
Nov
11
comment Propositions equivalent to the completeness of the real numbers
On page 13 of your RAiR paper, I'm pretty sure you'll need an ordinal with uncountable cofinality, which $\omega_1$ does not provably-in-ZF have. $\;$
Nov
10
comment Pursuit-Evasion type game on graph (“Flyswatter game”)
Note that it's not obvious that these games have well-defined values. $\;$
Oct
15
comment Can there be computable non-standard models of PA in a weaker sense?
@EmilJerabek : $\:$ Why does the "they would actually be" sentence hold? $\;\;\;\;$
Oct
15
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
14
comment Can there be computable non-standard models of PA in a weaker sense?
Since it only uses standard $p_i\hspace{-0.02 in}$, your argument doesn't need a multiplication oracle. $\hspace{1.6 in}$
Oct
14
revised Can there be computable non-standard models of PA in a weaker sense?
fixed another error in my statement of the Super-Strong version
Oct
14
revised Can there be computable non-standard models of PA in a weaker sense?
fixed issue of standard part
Oct
14
comment Smoothness of the fourth power of the geodesic distance in a Finsler geometry
^{4}\sqrt $\mapsto$ \sqrt[4] $\:$ ? $\;\;\;\;\;$
Oct
14
revised Can there be computable non-standard models of PA in a weaker sense?
simplified the Super-Strong version (it's still equivalent to the old super-strong version)
Oct
14
comment Can there be computable non-standard models of PA in a weaker sense?
@JoelDavidHamkins : $\;\;\;$ I head meant for the "Super-Strong" version to obviously be stronger than the weak version. $\:$ It is in fact stronger, since one can use the free term algebra on the metric space (so that inequality will be c.e.), but that's certainly not obvious. $\:$ Based on the idea of the free term algebra over the metric space, I'm about to simplify the statement of the Super-Strong version in a way that I believe gives something equivalent to what was there when you commented. $\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;$
Oct
14
comment Can there be computable non-standard models of PA in a weaker sense?
Excellent point about the weak version. $\:$ I did indeed have an error in my description of the strong version (f shouldn't be assumed computable), although I don't see how the computability of d had anything to do with that. $\;\;\;\;$