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seen Jan 3 at 9:16
I'm interested in many things, but algebraic geometry I love.

Oct
2
comment Is there a group-scheme equivalent of the theorem that any Lie group is diff. to a compact one cross R^n?
Yes, thanks Kevin. My question is: in what way does Chevalley's theorem answer the question? It's portrayed as a more general theorem than the one I stated in the question. I'm trying to understand why. In order to relate the two, I assumed that cfranc had it in his mind that $H$ is diff. to $\mathbb{R}^n$. Indeed you're right that there are problems with the definition of "diff." here, and even with "connected". Still -- for his answer to make sense he must have had an idea of how these two things are related in the classical case.
Oct
2
comment Is there a group-scheme equivalent of the theorem that any Lie group is diff. to a compact one cross R^n?
You mean to say that every (connected) linear group over $\mathbb{R}$ is diffeomorphic to $\mathbb{R}^n$? This seems like a stronger version of the theorem that every linear group is rational, but I've never heard of it before. Also, in the theorem you state, is it implied that $H$ is connected?
Oct
2
asked Is there a group-scheme equivalent of the theorem that any Lie group is diff. to a compact one cross R^n?
Sep
30
asked Innovations in deformation theory
Sep
12
comment Integrals from a non-analytic point of view
@Ricky: I forget. My last encounter with such ideas was roughly 13 years ago. But I'm looking for abstraction in a more categorical, rather than analytic, approach.
Sep
12
comment Integrals from a non-analytic point of view
@Will: That shows that integrals, as we already defined, work to define cohomology. But it doesn't get to the essence of what we want integrals to do (and then maybe we can define integrals to be any definition that does that?). In any case, having done number theoretic algebraic geometry for so long, I wonder what the essence of integrals (a tool I don't see very often in my work) is. What function do they provide? Is being an alternate way of defining cohomology really their only function?
Sep
12
asked Integrals from a non-analytic point of view
Aug
28
comment Is the strict transform a finite morphism?
Really? This perplexes me. This curve has only one tangent at the origin, and it is x=0. Indeed, the other affine would give (say v=1/s) y(v^2)=x-1 - which has no points above x=y=0.
Aug
28
asked Is the strict transform a finite morphism?
Aug
2
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
12
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
12
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
12
asked In what ways is physical intuition about mathematical objects non-rigorous?
Jun
11
comment Does every automorphism of G come from an inner automorphism of S_G?
That sounds interesting. Do you have a reference?
Jun
11
comment Does every automorphism of G come from an inner automorphism of S_G?
You would think this would be a more famous fact. I was always under the impression that outer automorphisms are much more mysterious than inner automorphisms.
Jun
11
accepted Does every automorphism of G come from an inner automorphism of S_G?
Jun
11
asked Does every automorphism of G come from an inner automorphism of S_G?
Jun
11
accepted Is there a ring of integers except for Z, such that every extension of it is ramified?
May
30
asked Is there a ring of integers except for Z, such that every extension of it is ramified?
May
4
awarded  Supporter