1,203 reputation
714
bio website cornellmath.wordpress.com
location Ithaca, NY
age 32
visits member for 5 years, 4 months
seen 4 hours ago
I was a graduate student at Cornell University studying harmonic analysis with Camil Muscalu. Now I'm a postdoc at Washington University in St. Louis.

Jun
14
answered Why do we care about L^p spaces besides p = 1, p = 2, and p = infinity?
Jun
12
comment Weighted Hardy Inequality for bounded domains
At least in the case where the function is zero at L, I suppose you've tried the change of variable x to v/(v+1), so that one can attempt to use the inequality in your link (after some algebra) and then do some more algebra to simplify things a bit? It seems like that would work to at least give you some control over the function u(x)-u(L). Would this be at all helpful for your purposes? Why do you need such an inequality?
Jun
7
comment What are your experiences of handouts in mathematics lectures?
Are you not free to disallow the use of laptops in class?
Jun
7
comment What are your experiences of handouts in mathematics lectures?
I completely agree with these sentiments, Terry. Such a system is extremely rewarding to students who work hard. Students all have varying levels of raw ability; the only thing you can do as an instructor is make hard work as valuable to them as possible.
Jun
7
comment Real analysis has no applications?
Greg, I completely agree with you regarding BC calculus. I took BC calculus in high school, and it was a wonderful experience. We did avoid some of the more rigorous details --- I think delta-epsilon proofs of continuity were completely absent, for instance --- but I think I still came out of that course with a great understanding of analysis. I clearly understood the delicate interplay between approximation and error terms. Once deltas and epsilons came, I needed only understand the framework; the tools were already there.
May
19
comment Why is Lebesgue integration taught using positive and negative parts of functions?
Fatou's lemma is pretty useful.
May
16
awarded  Commentator
May
16
comment Differentiable structures on R^3
The inverse of $x^3$ is not smooth, but the term diffeomorphism as it pertains to differentiable structures does not require this: a bijective map $f:\mathbb{R}\rightarrow\mathbb{R}$ is a diffeomorphism of $(\mathbb{R},A)$ and $(\mathbbf{R},B)$ if $x\in A$ iff $x(f)\in B$. Here A and B are maximal atlases.
May
15
comment Beginning a sentence with a mathematical symbol
Greg, do you have any particular examples worth sharing, or are you simply finding your prose has become a monotonous glob of ideas punctuated by thus and therefore?
May
15
answered Beginning a sentence with a mathematical symbol
May
15
comment If ErdÅ‘s is published as Erdös in a paper, which do I cite?
The definitive answer to "are there good math jokes?"
May
13
answered Would Euler's proofs get published in a modern math Journal, especially considering his treatment of the Infinite?
May
11
comment Evaluation of the following Series
Gerald, Max wrote the incorrect general term, hence my error. $\displaystyle{\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}{((2n-1)2n)^2}=\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}‌​{(2n-1)^2}-2\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}{((2n-1)2n)^2}+\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}{(2n‌​)^2}}$. The first and second sums add to give $\displaystyle{\sum_{n=1}^\infty\frac{1}{n^2}}$, which then gives Michael Greenblatt's result.
May
11
comment Evaluation of the following Series
Ah, I see, you have written the general term down incorrectly, Max. It is not $1/(n(n+1))^2$ . It should be $1/(2n(2n-1))^2$.
May
11
comment Evaluation of the following Series
The second sum which you have written does not sum to $\log 2$. It is an alternating series which sums to 1.
May
11
comment Evaluation of the following Series
haha I had just written this up a second before the site indicated you posted your solution... here is what I wrote: Write $\frac{1}{n^2(n+1)^2}=\left(\frac{1}{n}-\frac{1}{n+1}\right)^2=\frac{1}{n^2}-\fr‌​ac{2}{n(n+1)}+\frac{1}{(n+1)^2}$. Summing the first term gives $\pi^2/6$, the last term gives $-1+\pi^2/6$, and the middle term is an alternating seriesgives $-2$, so that the whole sum is $\frac{\pi^2}{3}-3$.
May
5
answered What are trig classes like within a universe that's “noticeably” hyperbolic?
May
4
comment How did Gauss discover the invariant density for the Gauss map?
You're very welcome!
May
3
answered How did Gauss discover the invariant density for the Gauss map?
May
1
awarded  Supporter