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Jan
29
comment What is the mathematical significance of the IHES logo?
How do you see this? Does it matter how you connect the ends (at oo)? JV
Jan
29
comment What is the mathematical significance of the IHES logo?
I saw this webpage, but I couldn't discern specific content. There are several knots shown on this page: at the top, there are the Mobius figure 8 knot as well as a tubular (3,5) torus knot. These are different knots, and it is not claimed that the IHES knot is either of these. Can you help to clarify why this website answers my question? JV
Jan
28
asked What is the mathematical significance of the IHES logo?
Jan
27
revised Average of Fourier coefficients of a cusp form of half integral weight
added 10 characters in body
Jan
27
awarded  Revival
Jan
26
answered Average of Fourier coefficients of a cusp form of half integral weight
Jan
2
awarded  Self-Learner
Jan
2
awarded  Yearling
Dec
23
revised Quaternion orders such that every proper ideal is invertible
added 17 characters in body
Dec
23
answered Quaternion orders such that every proper ideal is invertible
Dec
23
asked Quaternion orders such that every proper ideal is invertible
Dec
4
answered Does $S$ being a free rank-$n$ $R$-algebra imply that $S/R$ is free rank $n-1$?
Dec
3
revised Reference request for $R$-index
edited body
Dec
2
asked Reference request for $R$-index
Oct
26
comment Locally square implies square
Yes, it is a difference; the matter of whether or not this is a "big" difference depends on the context. Personally, I found it helpful to see the example and how it was used, YMMV. That being said, I also do not know if there is an irreducible counterexample to the original question.
Oct
25
answered Locally square implies square
Sep
25
accepted Noncommutative group of invertible ideals of a ring
Aug
1
comment Segments of Voronoi Diagrams on smooth manifolds. Are they geodesics?
Nevermind: on a small enough neighborhood around each point of the bisector, the geodesics from the point cover all possible tangent directions. In particular, if the bisector contains all geodesics between points, then it is totally geodesic.
Aug
1
comment Segments of Voronoi Diagrams on smooth manifolds. Are they geodesics?
This paper only says that bisectors in $M$ are totally geodesic if and only if $M$ has constant curvature. This makes no difference for the original poster's question which was one-dimensional, but isn't it true that a bisector $B$ can be geodesic (the geodesic between any two distinct points in $B$ is contained in $B$) without being totally geodesic? I'm thinking, for example, of products.
Jul
29
awarded  Revival