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Nov
16
reviewed Leave Open number of divisors
Nov
15
comment $\pm1$-polynomials with a maximal non-real root
Very interesting! Clearly there's something to think through there.
Nov
14
reviewed Close Pronunciation: Dijkstra
Nov
14
reviewed Leave Open Infected square
Nov
14
reviewed Reviewed Converting p-adic to decimal
Nov
14
reviewed Leave Open Grothendieck -sad news
Nov
13
reviewed Close Oldest photographed mathematician
Nov
13
comment Bound for sums of bounded multiplicative functions that are zero at primes
The number of square-full integers up to $x$ is $O(x^{\frac 12})$.
Nov
12
comment $\pm1$-polynomials with a maximal non-real root
Interesting! I don't know what it means! You could also look at the Odlyzko-Poonen situation, and see if there is a pattern to the polynomials there that have largest non-real root. Maybe that problem will have a similar feature to what you're seeing here?
Nov
12
reviewed Close Integer-valuedness of a polynomial determined by output of first n integers?
Nov
11
reviewed Reject nontrivial theorems with trivial proofs
Nov
11
reviewed Reject Refereeing a Paper
Nov
11
reviewed Leave Closed iterative solution better than analytic solution?
Nov
10
reviewed Reviewed Looking for the name of an infinite sequence
Nov
10
comment A number theoretic identity
Do those who voted to close see an easy proof of this? It seems a remarkable fact to me (if true), but maybe I'm missing something obvious. The objection that the problem is unmotivated doesn't seem correct to me: if the numbers from $1$ to $m$ are permuted randomly without fixed points, the expected value of $|a-\sigma(a)|$ would be the answer given. It's not at all clear to me why multiplication by $\lambda$ should always give exactly this answer.
Nov
10
answered $\pm1$-polynomials with a maximal non-real root
Nov
10
reviewed Reopen A number theoretic identity
Nov
9
comment $\pm1$-polynomials with a maximal non-real root
Most of the zeros of a $\pm 1$ polynomial will cluster around the unit circle, and get equidistributed in angle. So every point on the unit circle is a limit point of zeros.
Nov
9
reviewed Close Your experience of Computer Science/Programming in Mathematics Education?
Nov
9
reviewed No Action Needed Determining Roots of a Polynomial with Interval Estimates of Coefficients