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seen Nov 30 '10 at 17:28
I am an undergraduate CS student who spends a lot of spare time meandering his way through theory and math. I am interested in beautiful things, but also in practical things. I prefer constructive proofs, but respect Erdos and those like him all the same.

Nov
12
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
16
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
18
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
30
comment Ingenuity in mathematics
I barely ever log into this stack exchange; I just browse. But the low score on this answer bugged me. It's a fantastic answer. I roomed with an art major my second and third year of college. He is particularly bright and very multi-talented individual but not trained in mathematics to any capacity. He understood Cantor's Diagonalization easily and declared, "Ross, you just blew my mind!" (as though the proof were my own.) Douglas Hofstadter provides a really simple explanation of all three of these suggestions. I might suggest skipping (the proof of) Godel's Incompleteness Thm., though.
Apr
21
comment Random Walk anecdote.
Ahh, in fact I do plan to use this in the article (I already knew the quote and its author). The article is about the number three and where it shows up as a transition point to more interesting and complex behavior. You know, like the 3-body problem, 3-dimension random walks, 3-colorings of planar maps, 3-SAT and NP-Completeness, FLT, or 3 bubble conjecture. I would post on MO for more but I have a suspicion the question would not be received well. As for this answer, it isn't quite an anecdote, although fantastic nevertheless.
Apr
21
awarded  Commentator
Apr
21
comment Random Walk anecdote.
Thank you. This is exactly what I was looking for.
Apr
21
accepted Random Walk anecdote.
Apr
21
asked Random Walk anecdote.
Mar
31
comment The limits of parallelism
While each state of the evolving system might be computed in parallel, physical systems can only be computed in parallel and the amount of time it takes for the electron calculations in the antiferromagnet to settle take time exponential in the base (as would be expected). Of course this doesn't count as a proof until we are certain that physics computations DO require serial computations. Right now we only have good reason to believe.
Mar
31
comment The limits of parallelism
Oh okay. I misunderstood. I have an anecdotal example then... physical calculations can be done in parallel but only to a certain extent. Each "state" of a physical system depends on the full configuration of the previous state. There is a way to encode the partition problem (NP-Complete) into a physics calculation of electron spins in an infinite-range antiferromagnet [due to Stephan Mertens].
Mar
30
answered The limits of parallelism
Mar
21
comment Analog to the Chinese Remainder Theorem in groups other than Z_n.
I apologize for the question. I wasn't just looking for just cryptographic applications. I was really interested in whether CRT was a curiousity related to the integers or whether there was something more profound going on. As some comments pointed out this information was on Wikipedia and that I had missed it.
Mar
21
accepted Analog to the Chinese Remainder Theorem in groups other than Z_n.
Mar
21
comment Analog to the Chinese Remainder Theorem in groups other than Z_n.
This is really interesting. It's a shame I can't accept two answers.
Mar
21
comment Analog to the Chinese Remainder Theorem in groups other than Z_n.
Thanks, I removed "simple" from the question. I figured this was legit and interesting enough for research mathematicians, but I could be mistaken. If I am, I apologize in advance.
Mar
21
revised Analog to the Chinese Remainder Theorem in groups other than Z_n.
deleted 3 characters in body; deleted 6 characters in body
Mar
21
asked Analog to the Chinese Remainder Theorem in groups other than Z_n.
Mar
19
awarded  Scholar
Mar
19
accepted Number of unique determinants for an NxN (0,1)-matrix.