6,842 reputation
22147
bio website people.ucsc.edu/~weissman
location Around and about
age 37
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen 8 hours ago

Associate Professor, Yale-NUS College, Singapore.

Associate Professor of Mathematics, UC Santa Cruz. (On leave)

Research interests: Automorphic representations and representations of p-adic groups, especially exceptional groups and "metaplectic" groups lately. Theta correspondences (exceptional ones). Geometric methods in representation theory. Periods and Hodge theory. Model theory applied to number theory and geometry.

Book blog: Illustrated Theory of Numbers


Aug
29
answered Are the quaternions not uncountably categorical?
Aug
16
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
13
comment What is the analogue of simple prime closed geodesic for prime numbers?
Birman and Series (J. Lond Math Soc 1984) characterize non-self-intersection of a closed loop via a group-theoretic property of the corresponding element in the fundamental group. Their characterization depends on the Nielesen generators available for $\pi_1$ of cpt orientable surfaces with non-empty bdry. Wild out of the blue idea: try something similar, with Frobenius at $p$, and the usual generators of the Grothendieck-Teichmuller group.
Aug
8
comment Examples of research on how people perceive mathematical objects
Have you seen George Lakoff, "Where mathematics comes from?" He's a cognitive linguist at Berkeley, well-known for work on metaphor. See amazon.com/Where-Mathematics-Come-From-Embodied/dp/0465037712
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
6
revised How to estimate the Haar measure on $G_2$
expressed my growing confidence :p
Jun
6
revised How to estimate the Haar measure on $G_2$
Changed a 6 to a 7.
Jun
6
comment How to estimate the Haar measure on $G_2$
I'm very curious where this sequence of real numbers came from!
Jun
6
answered How to estimate the Haar measure on $G_2$
May
13
comment Functoriality for triple product GL(2) x GL(2) x GL(2)
The slightly longer answer is that proving such a result using traditional methods would be to check nice analytic properties for L-functions of twists, e.g. L(s, f x g x h x j) where j is an automorphic form on GL(7) (or a bit lower if you're lucky). That's out of range for now, as far as I can tell.
May
2
comment Does every reductive group scheme admit a maximal torus?
A maximal torus T in GL(E) over S (with E a vector bundle) gives a decomposition of the vector bundle into line bundles. You can see this, even working with S a smooth variety over the complex numbers, since the eigenspaces for T give a local decomposition of E into 1-dim spaces.
Mar
24
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
24
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
23
comment Local Langlands for $GL(2,\mathbf{C})$ and reducible principal series
That one should work too, with U the (say) upper-triangular unipotent radical. It's equivalent, I think after substitution, to the one I wrote down with the lower-triangular unipotent radical. The important thing is to use whatever unipotent radical is opposite of the one used for parabolic induction in $I(\chi_1, \chi_2)$.
Mar
22
answered Local Langlands for $GL(2,\mathbf{C})$ and reducible principal series
Feb
9
comment Homology of compact symmetric spaces
Have you checked in a book like Joe Wolf's "Spaces of Constant Curvature"
Jan
29
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
29
awarded  Nice Answer