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bio website people.ucsc.edu/~weissman
location Around and about
age 37
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen 1 hour ago

Associate Professor, Yale-NUS College, Singapore.

Associate Professor of Mathematics, UC Santa Cruz. (On leave)

Research interests: Automorphic representations and representations of p-adic groups, especially exceptional groups and "metaplectic" groups lately. Theta correspondences (exceptional ones). Geometric methods in representation theory. Periods and Hodge theory. Model theory applied to number theory and geometry.

Book blog: Illustrated Theory of Numbers


3h
comment Journals dedicated towards work exploring the development of toy systems of axioms?
Might I suggest the Journal Of Your Favorite Axioms Regarding True Stuff. :)
Mar
24
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
24
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
23
comment Local Langlands for $GL(2,\mathbf{C})$ and reducible principal series
That one should work too, with U the (say) upper-triangular unipotent radical. It's equivalent, I think after substitution, to the one I wrote down with the lower-triangular unipotent radical. The important thing is to use whatever unipotent radical is opposite of the one used for parabolic induction in $I(\chi_1, \chi_2)$.
Mar
22
answered Local Langlands for $GL(2,\mathbf{C})$ and reducible principal series
Feb
9
comment Homology of compact symmetric spaces
Have you checked in a book like Joe Wolf's "Spaces of Constant Curvature"
Jan
29
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
26
awarded  Yearling
Jan
21
revised classifying $\infty$-toposes for topological/localic groups?
Significant edit, after comments.
Jan
21
comment classifying $\infty$-toposes for topological/localic groups?
Hmmm - I guess the ncat lab says CGWH is Cartesian closed but not locally Cartesian closed. Well, I'll leave the answer as a warning to others.
Jan
21
answered classifying $\infty$-toposes for topological/localic groups?
Jan
7
comment Mathematical research published in the form of poems
"The English examples ("The Kiss Precise" etc.) are clearly poems. I hope people won't start thinking that scanned Chinese examples are similar to those by any stretch of the imagination. I'm sure you've looked at things like the Joseph Needham, and maybe it would help to bring in sources that are more scholarly than wikipedia."
Jan
7
comment Mathematical research published in the form of poems
"Many of Confucius' aphorisms and sayings sound like this, but no one would call those poetry. Regulated prose is a dominant characteristic of ancient Chinese writing and found throughout the development of the essay form in Chinese, and it is very wrong to call it "poetry" (because the Chinese do have poetry qua poetry), and very wrong to claim that it is specific to mathematical treatises..."
Jan
7
comment Mathematical research published in the form of poems
"...I'd say that the additional example from Sun Zi is "regulated prose"; that is to say, it is "high" literary Chinese written with attention to parallelism, tonality, parts of speech, and other aesthetic conventions that one also finds in poetry. Prose written this way is considered elegant and sophisticated. The fact that Sun Zi's prose is regulated (using a fixed number of characters for each line, making the lines rhyme where possible but following no particular pattern of rhymes) makes the text easier to read (and remember) for the ancient reader, and the author seem more learned...
Jan
7
comment Mathematical research published in the form of poems
"Happy New Year! Well the post is fascinating, but completely wrong. The first two examples (the first two pictures) are actually the same page of the same book (the Nine Chapters)--it's just that one is a more modern facsimile of the manuscript--I am not sure why the person couldn't supply more examples if he wanted to claim that "almost all of Chinese math is poetry"? But the examples they gave (including the "additional" ones in the responses) are not poetry...
Jan
7
comment Mathematical research published in the form of poems
I asked a colleague -- an expert in Chinese poetry -- about this, and his response is below...
Dec
30
comment Mathematical research published in the form of poems
I think this answer is just false. Neither the Nine Chapters nor the Suan Shu Shu ("Book on Numbers and Computation") are written as poems. If you want to look towards India, however, you'll find much better examples.
Dec
3
comment Is there a 0-1 law for the theory of groups?
@Michael, I think the more typical way to count isomorphism classes is to weight each class by the reciprocal of the cardinality of its automorphism group. So, each cyclic group of order $N$ would be weighted by $1 / \phi(N)$, for example.