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bio website homepages.ucl.ac.uk/~ucapsse
location London, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 4 years, 9 months
seen Oct 16 at 13:23

Oct
16
answered Form of the Shannon capacity for Heptagon?
Oct
16
comment Characterization of a family of interval graphs
Thanks for the useful comments. Then the set of graphs that I considered is nothing but the set of interval graphs.
Oct
15
revised Characterization of a family of interval graphs
edited body
Oct
15
asked Characterization of a family of interval graphs
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Mar
11
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
10
comment Source for Derogatory Quote About Graph Theory
Whitehead! Thanks a lot for the answers. And sorry for the wrong paraphrase. Indeed, could not remember -- Memory's like a train: you can see it getting smaller as it pulls away (Tom Waits).
Mar
10
revised Source for Derogatory Quote About Graph Theory
fixed terms.
Mar
10
accepted Source for Derogatory Quote About Graph Theory
Mar
10
asked Source for Derogatory Quote About Graph Theory
Feb
12
accepted A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
Feb
12
comment A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
Then this is the answer! Thank you!
Feb
12
revised A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
removed the picture
Feb
12
revised A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
deleted 8 characters in body
Feb
12
revised A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
added 13 characters in body
Feb
12
revised A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
modified title and added alternative statement
Feb
12
revised A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
improved formatting
Feb
11
comment A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
@MarzioDeBiasi: The maximum length. Honestly, I am not sure whether the two problems that you mention are really different. It may well be. In the example that you give, let us consider the circuit ((1,4),(1,3)). If we swap the lines 1 and 3, we obtain ((3,4),(1,3)). Now, if we swap the lines 1 and 2 (these are 2 and 3 in the new arrangement), we obtain ((3,4),(2,3)). So, the maximum length of the circuit ((1,4),(1,3)) is 1 since 4-3=1 and 3-2=1. The permutation that we used is 2314. The other example is exactly the one in the fig and the max length is again 1. In fact it's the same circuit.
Feb
11
comment A combinatorial problem concerned with logic circuits
@FelixGoldberg: The only crossings in the graph are given by the gates crossing the bit lines. Of course, the graph is drawn in the plane in a very special way. We can only permute the bit lines in order to change the number of crossings, but nothing else.
Feb
10
awarded  Promoter