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16h
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
30
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
20
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
18
revised Is there a smooth manifold which admits only rigid metrics?
added 603 characters in body
Apr
18
comment Is there a smooth manifold which admits only rigid metrics?
@HJRW: Whoops, you're right! For instance, flat tori have infinite-order isometries. However, using a little more technology one can show that my examples still work. I'll edit the answer accordingly.
Apr
18
answered Is there a smooth manifold which admits only rigid metrics?
Apr
6
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
16
comment Mapping class groups acting on simple closed curves
Yes, and the ideas are exactly the same anyway.
Mar
16
comment Mapping class groups acting on simple closed curves
If you want the honest fundamental group (not the orbifold fundamental group), then you are wrong in the closed case: in fact, $\mathcal{M}_g$ is simply-connected! See [Maclachlan, Colin, Modulus space is simply-connected, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 29 1971 85–86.]. Adding enough marked points fixes this by getting rid of torsion in the mapping class group; you then have that the mapping class group equals the fundamental group. As for how transitively the mapping class group acts on SCC's, this is very easy; see the "Change of coordinates principle" in Farb-Margalit's book.
Mar
16
comment Mapping class groups acting on simple closed curves
Your answer leaves me even more confused about your question. Aren't $G$ and $H$ the same group?
Mar
15
comment Mapping class groups acting on simple closed curves
What definitions are you using? The standard definitions have the fundamental group of the moduli space of curves equal to the mapping class group even when there are punctures.
Feb
25
comment Eliminating Gibbs phenomenon, and approximating with jumping functions in Fourier Analysis : An attempt and a question in this regard
You broke your promise and just made a 24th edit. I think it is time to close this question.
Feb
18
answered Definition of the Teichmuller space via topological marking of the $\pi_1$
Feb
14
awarded  Necromancer
Feb
4
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
25
comment Evaluate a Function to Full Machine Precision
This is a standard exercise in using Taylor's theorem with remainder. I've voted to close.
Jan
17
revised Is the Steinberg representation always irreducible?
added 933 characters in body
Jan
17
comment Is the Steinberg representation always irreducible?
As I discussed in the addendum to my answer, in the context I care about the definition I gave is correct, even for infinite fields.
Jan
17
comment Is the Steinberg representation always irreducible?
Thanks! As I discussed in the addendum to my question, the field I am particularly interested in is $\mathbb{Q}$, but from looking around my guess is that your answer is the extent of what is known.