Reputation
23,820
Next privilege 25,000 Rep.
Access to site analytics
Badges
5 100 180
Impact
~869k people reached

2d
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
25
comment Evaluate a Function to Full Machine Precision
This is a standard exercise in using Taylor's theorem with remainder. I've voted to close.
Jan
17
revised Is the Steinberg representation always irreducible?
added 933 characters in body
Jan
17
comment Is the Steinberg representation always irreducible?
As I discussed in the addendum to my answer, in the context I care about the definition I gave is correct, even for infinite fields.
Jan
17
comment Is the Steinberg representation always irreducible?
Thanks! As I discussed in the addendum to my question, the field I am particularly interested in is $\mathbb{Q}$, but from looking around my guess is that your answer is the extent of what is known.
Jan
17
accepted Is the Steinberg representation always irreducible?
Jan
14
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
13
asked Is the Steinberg representation always irreducible?
Jan
11
comment What is, really, the stable homotopy category?
That might be right. I certainly learned this stuff from Adams and have not read Boardman. Sorry for missing that parenthetical remark.
Jan
11
comment What is, really, the stable homotopy category?
The third part of Adams's book "Stable homotopy and generalized homology" is a standard source for Boardman's category of spectra.
Dec
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
28
comment All compact surfaces $S\subseteq \mathbb{R}^3$ are rigid?
I dream that someday mathematicians will learn to spell my last name correctly. Sigh.
Nov
28
revised All compact surfaces $S\subseteq \mathbb{R}^3$ are rigid?
edited body
Nov
28
comment All compact surfaces $S\subseteq \mathbb{R}^3$ are rigid?
Though I don't know much about the problem you state, it is worth pointing out that there are natural generalizations of it which are false. Namely, there exist polyhedra (necessarily non-convex) in $\mathbb{R}^3$ that can be "flexed" (i.e. deformed though non-rigid motions). To relate this to what you've stated, observe that their piecewise-linear structure endows such polyhedra with path metrics that are piecewise flat, and of course those path metrics are unchanged during the flexing. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flexible_polyhedron
Nov
27
answered Distance between two knots
Nov
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
18
awarded  Enlightened