22,353 reputation
594167
bio website math.rice.edu/~andyp
location Houston, TX
age 35
visits member for 5 years, 9 months
seen 11 hours ago
associate professor at Rice University

Jul
22
comment Analytic Number Theory without Pigeonhole Principle
I think your impression that analytic number theory is heavily based around combinatorial ideas is incorrect. While I am far from an expert in the subject, my impression is that most work in the subject uses serious analytic tools that are not really combinatorial, e.g. Fourier analysis as in the circle method and complex analysis.
Jul
21
awarded  Good Question
Jul
14
awarded  Guru
Jul
9
answered Exotic C^k manifolds
Jul
8
answered Well-ordered reference
Jul
6
comment What technical and/or theoretical challenges are involved in automatically extracting proofs from books and papers into Coq code?
of the argument is. I've gotten annoyed at papers plenty of times for giving too many routine details. But proof assistants can't fill in the missing parts by themselves. You have to spend way too much time on the boring stuff. That's why I for instance am not interested in spending time trying to formalize my proofs.
Jul
6
comment What technical and/or theoretical challenges are involved in automatically extracting proofs from books and papers into Coq code?
I think that the words "implicit knowledge" might be misleading. It's not that there are folklore theorems that people are using. Rather, there are lots of routine arguments that people have seen over and over again during their education. When you write a paper, you don't spell these out, but just give the major steps. Experts can easily see what is going on. Students suffer a bit; this is why graduate students often spend days on single pages of papers. I should say that this is true even for good writing. If you give too many details, it can be hard to sort out where the "meat"
Jul
6
comment Which journals publish research announcements?
The bulletin of the London math society publishes short papers, but not research announcements.
Jul
6
comment Which journals publish research announcements?
that were being (slowly) refereed elsewhere, but that function has basically been taken over by the internet/arXiv. I should add also that in my experience mathematicians do not take research announcements very seriously when evaluating people for hiring/promotion/etc.
Jul
6
comment Which journals publish research announcements?
OK, I misunderstood you. I thought you meant that the short paper was published instead of the long version, which remained as a permanent preprint. What I wonder now is how the process you describe actually speeds things up. Carefully refereeing a long paper is the thing that takes real time, and there is no way to speed it up. The time between acceptance and publication might be sped up, but in my experience mathematicians do not distinguish between papers that are accepted and papers that have appeared. In a previous era, research announcements were used to claim credit for results
Jul
5
comment Which journals publish research announcements?
I think you are mistaken about the french system: all the french mathematicians I know publish complete proofs of their theorems. It is vital for the scientific record that the proofs of theorems are carefully refereed and that they are published. Sometimes it takes a long time, but there is no shortcut.
Jul
5
comment Which journals publish research announcements?
@SergeiAkbarov: Though I am aware of journals that publish research announcements (with the expectation that the complete paper will be published elsewhere; this is what Comptes Rendus does, for instance), I have never heard of a western journal that published papers without proofs like you describe. And research announcements are much less common now with the internet. What's the purpose in publishing them?
Jul
5
comment Which journals publish research announcements?
Proc AMS does not publish research announcements.
Jun
19
comment Homotopy type of a CW complex
Yes, see Corollary A.12 of Hatcher's book.
Jun
18
comment What would you do if you improve your own result that is submitted but not publishied?
@GerryMyerson: This being the internet, we can be certain that whatever the distribution is, the mean level of trustworthiness is vanishingly small.
Jun
17
comment What would you do if you improve your own result that is submitted but not publishied?
This is a complicated and slightly delicate question. You should ask mentors who know your situation well (e.g. your advisor if you are still a student) rather than trust random people on the internet.
Jun
10
comment Should we post on arXiv only papers in publishable shape (or very close)?
The only way to repair your reputation is by doing good research. A few strong papers would certainly make quite a bit of difference. You should also talk to your mentors about this. They can give you advice that is far more tailored to your situation than that coming from some strangers on the internet.
Jun
9
comment Should we post on arXiv only papers in publishable shape (or very close)?
If you are a youngish person, you should never post papers to the arXiv that are not in publishable shape. People will judge you very negatively. Sometimes senior people whose reputations are secure do this for various reasons, but you don't want a poorly written/incomplete paper to form one of the earliest impressions of you that the community makes.
Jun
3
answered Realizing braid group by homeomorphisms
Jun
1
comment Introductory article of knot Heegaard Floer Homology
This it totally on-topic, so you should not feel bad at all for posting it. It's a great and useful answer!