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257109
bio website math.purdue.edu/~eremenko
location United States
age 60
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
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Math Professor

11h
answered On the existence of compactly supported functions whose its Fourier transform satisfies a given condition
1d
comment Teaching the fundamental group via everyday examples
@Sam Nead: Thanks! I downloaded Demaine. What is "Quantum"? Is this the English translation of the Russian Kvant journal? Or something else? MSN does not list the journal with such name.
2d
comment Real points of zero-dimensional real algebraic varieties
Yes, with different assumptions the result is different. As you can see from the one polynomial in one variable case.
2d
answered Real points of zero-dimensional real algebraic varieties
2d
comment Real points of zero-dimensional real algebraic varieties
I believe it is $\sqrt{d}$, where $d$ is the product of degrees = number of complex solutions, but I do not remember the reference in higher dimension.
2d
revised Teaching the fundamental group via everyday examples
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2d
revised Teaching the fundamental group via everyday examples
added 204 characters in body
2d
revised Teaching the fundamental group via everyday examples
added 204 characters in body
2d
answered Teaching the fundamental group via everyday examples
Oct
18
comment Inequality for an integral involving $ \exp $, $ \sin $ and $ \cos $
@Christian Rempling: integral of $x\sin(2\pi x)$ over this range will depend on $k$. And the desired estimate does not depend on $k$.
Oct
18
revised Inequality for an integral involving $ \exp $, $ \sin $ and $ \cos $
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Oct
18
comment Inequality for an integral involving $ \exp $, $ \sin $ and $ \cos $
What range of $t$ are you interested in?
Oct
18
answered Inequality for an integral involving $ \exp $, $ \sin $ and $ \cos $
Oct
17
comment Hill's discriminant and spectral properties of Schrödinger operator
They do not claim that they arguments constitute a proof of theorem 1: instead they refer to [6,16].
Oct
16
comment Analytic extension of the exterior Newtonian potential into the domain
The boundary of these domains is analytic. Look in the literature I recommended.
Oct
16
comment Analytic extension of the exterior Newtonian potential into the domain
Can someone explain her reasons for closing this question??
Oct
16
revised Analytic extension of the exterior Newtonian potential into the domain
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Oct
16
answered Analytic extension of the exterior Newtonian potential into the domain
Oct
13
comment Is this series well known?
@Dirk: Why almost? Is $(n^2)!$ "almost" $n^2$?
Oct
13
comment Is this series well known?
@Brendan McKey: $n$-th term becomes the biggest when $t\sim n^2$.