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11848
bio website bu.edu/sed/about-us/faculty/…
location Boston University, SED
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 8 hours ago

If you would like to contact me directly, please do!

Electronic correspondence: bdickman[at]bu。edu

Profile for Benjamin Dickman on Stack Exchange: MESE, MSE, and MO

Postdoctoral Fellow, Mathematics Education, Boston University SED.

Ph.D., Mathematics Education, Columbia University. 2014. NSFGRFP.

Dissertation: Conceptions of Creativity in Elementary School Mathematical Problem Posing.

(Relevant MESE post here.)

M.Phil., Mathematics Education, Columbia University. 2014.

Fulbright Grant, Mathematics/Mathematics Education, Nanjing Normal University (南京师范大学). 2008-2009.

Research Topic: High School Mathematics Teacher Training in China.

B.A., Mathematics, Amherst College. 2008. Honors Program.

Undergraduate Thesis: On a Theorem of Dwork.

(Relevant MSE post here.)


Have you solved any of my puzzles? If so, send me an email!


May
2
comment Guess that group via product queries
Loosely related? is MO 107298: Realizable Order Sequences for Finite Groups
Apr
19
comment Simultaneously using the real and 2adic norms
Not an answer to your question, but the "lynch pin" you identify leads me to recall the very end of Koblitz's book p-adic Numbers, p-adic Analysis, and Zeta-Functions in which he finishes his write-up of Dwork's Theorem (rationality of the Weil Conjectures) as follows.
Apr
17
awarded  Yearling
Apr
11
comment Do rational numbers admit a categorification which respects the following “duality”?
Just to link back: This question also connects, to some extent, with the answer I put up to MESE 7837.
Apr
4
revised The diameter of a certain graph on the positive integers
Corrected 69+52 sum (as suggested by joro in a comment)
Apr
2
revised Elementary examples of the Weil conjectures
Finally fixing a couple of TeX typos that have been irking me!
Mar
28
comment Texts about Dwork's work
Certainly check out Koblitz's book (if you haven't already) entitled, "p-adic Numbers, p-adic Analysis, and Zeta-Functions" as mentioned here...
Mar
6
revised Exact reference for Liouville theorem
edited tags
Mar
6
answered Exact reference for Liouville theorem
Jan
25
comment How to calculate the infinite sum of this double series?
See also: math.stackexchange.com/q/1117583/37122
Jan
16
comment Extending an assignment property from Q to R (or C)
(See also: A Problem That Bears Repeating: 11002 in the AMM.)
Jan
14
comment What mathematical models can analyze and optimize systems based on gossip?
The first thing that comes to mind for me is a note about a secondary school lesson plan; on the off chance that it is of any use, here is a link to the page 8 excerpt from this lesson in COMAP's Mathematical Modeling Handbook.
Jan
10
awarded  Pundit
Jan
9
comment Cube-free infinite binary words
@JoelReyesNoche Ah, I see now that $x$ can be one or more letters; my erroneous count is for the restriction $|x| = 1$. Thanks for the clarification.
Jan
9
comment Cube-free infinite binary words
@JoelReyesNoche and OP: w.r.t. (3) - Isn't the number of finite binary cfw of length $n$ just twice the $(n+1)$st Fibonacci number?
Jan
3
comment Are there any serious investigations of whether “mathematicians do their best work when they're young”?
Simonton's 1997 article is available here.
Jan
1
comment Who first introduced the functional definition of symmetry?
I had wondered specifically if there was anything of value in foot-note 3 of p. 163: The source is in German (Wulff, 1897) but I could not track down that particular reference... You are right that it (and other sources) are mentioned in Hilton (1903); I had not searched through Hilton for that reference, though it makes sense reading Rogers' acknowledgement at the end of the paper. (In any event: your answer here is very nice!)
Dec
31
comment Who first introduced the functional definition of symmetry?
You might check: Rogers, A. F. (1926). A mathematical study of crystal symmetry. Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (pp. 161-203). American Academy of Arts and Sciences. (In particular, "Symmetry Operations" beginning on p. 162 and the references contained therein.)
Dec
29
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
28
comment Mod sequences that seem to become constant; and the number 316
@PaceNielsen I think this is the same as your latter observation, just slightly restated: Even in JO'R's original problem, assuming randomness, the chance of getting a number to appear for a second time in a row is $1/n$ for step $n$ (really beginning at step two, so your product counter would start at $n=2$). As István observes, a number appearing twice in a row is sufficient for the sequence to become constant. So the probability of no repeats is $\prod_{n=2}^{\infty} (1-1/n) \rightarrow 0$. There would need to be a major conspiracy for there never to be any repetition...