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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
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Jul
8
asked Ideals in a subalgebra in $C^\infty(M)$
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
This will be my handbook. Like Bible. :)
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
It is easy to prove of course, but it is not good to write this proof in a paper, or to use this result without reference. Ben, I don't like the formulation of this fact that Fulton and Harris give at p.444. This is not for normal mathematician, you must have some background in representation theory to recognize what I need in what they say. I believe there are texts with simpler formulations. And, by the way, I need also the constructions of real and imaginary parts, and their properties. Of course this is trivial, but I'd like to have a book on my table.
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
"a complex vector space is the complexification of a real vector space just when it bears a conjugate linear involution operator" -- I need this and the construction of involution on the dual space. But I think it's not nice to write this without reference. Or you mean that this is stated in the Fulton-Harris book?
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
No doubts, but which book to cite?
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
I think this is not what I need. They introduce the operation of taking complex conjugate vector, but only in the case when $X$ is a complexification of a given real vector space $Y$, not for an arbitrary complex vector space $X$... Or I missed something?
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
Remizov, actually... I deduce from this mistake, that you are Russian. Приятно познакомиться, сейчас погляжу.
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
@Paul Reynolds: Do you mean the book by J.F.Adams "Lectures on Lie groups"? Where does he write about this?
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
I do not understand. I need a source for reference, the book must contain a list of properties of this notion.
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
It doesn't matter, of course, on which discipline the book is. John Roe's book, do you mean this one: folk.uio.no/rognes/higson/Book.pdf ?
Jul
7
comment A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
You don't remember details? Title, author?
Jul
7
asked A textbook on linear algebra where involutions on linear spaces are considered
Jul
7
awarded  Fanatic
Jun
20
comment Is the Mendeleev table explained in quantum mechanics?
Ben, you should explain yourself, this sounds strong: "The answer to 1 is yes". And this also: "physical theories aren't axiomatic systems". What about classical mechanics? Or probability theory?
Jun
18
accepted Is the Mendeleev table explained in quantum mechanics?
Jun
7
comment Defining a topology in the Power Set
A remark to the construction of Dan Ramras: it becomes much more interesting if you endow the two point space, let us denote it by $2=\{0,1\}$, with the connected topology, where $\{0\}$ is closed and $\{1\}$ is open. Then the pre-image of $\{0\}$ is closed in $T$, and the pre-image of $\{1\}$ is open. And the set $2^T$ of maps $f:T\to 2$ is in one-to-one correspondense with the set of all closed (/open) subsets in $T$, and you can endow $2^T$ with different interesting topologies. So actually, I think you should understand first, whether you need all subsets in $T$ or, say, just closed ones.
Jun
3
revised Naive question about the representation theory of algebraic groups and hopf algebras
deleted 2 characters in body
May
23
comment Homomorphisms preserving constant functions
You should explain your notations (and the notion of homomorphism).
May
6
comment Is rigour just a ritual that most mathematicians wish to get rid of if they could?
Fedja, too venomously in the last paragraph. In my opinion.
May
5
comment A sufficient condition for a probability measure to have compact support
No, actually, I don't know...