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Jun
22
comment Why is the output of an LTI system the convolution of the input funtion and the impulse response?
All right. I was too locked in to use $f$ as the $f$unction letter. Also, our prof has been using $\omega$, the circular frequency, which equals to $2\pi f$, mostly. -- I am aware of the advantages of doing things in the frequency domain but I'd nevertheless like to see the mess I'm avoiding, just once, to have an better understanding of what I'm doing
Jun
22
awarded  Scholar
Jun
22
awarded  Student
Jun
22
comment Why is the output of an LTI system the convolution of the input funtion and the impulse response?
This (together with khanacademy.org/video/… & a variety of other documents) helped me actually understand what convolution is. -- Thanks a lot! -- // Because an R-C-Circuit can only be described by dirac- or step-function response or an ODE in the time domain, my quest for a "system function" f(x) must be futile, it seems. Correct?
Jun
22
accepted Why is the output of an LTI system the convolution of the input funtion and the impulse response?
Jun
22
comment Why is the output of an LTI system the convolution of the input funtion and the impulse response?
Thanks a lot. The answer is not that useful to me because I am not familiar with the term "input-output operator". I find $f$ a confusing choice for the name of a constant here. Furthermore I'd prefer to look at the problem without changing to the frequency domain. As to the "system function": How would it look like?
Jun
21
asked Why is the output of an LTI system the convolution of the input funtion and the impulse response?