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Feb
26
awarded  Notable Question
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7
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Nov
17
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
6
awarded  Yearling
Nov
27
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Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Mar
15
accepted How useful/pervasive are differential forms in surface theory?
Mar
13
comment How useful/pervasive are differential forms in surface theory?
Thanks Richard. Do you have a pointer to a good proof of Gauss-Bonnet using forms? I typically have the students prove the discrete analog (via angle defect), but have so far not found a nice, simple proof of the smooth version that uses forms.
Mar
9
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
9
comment How useful/pervasive are differential forms in surface theory?
Thank you Deane; thank you Robert. These answers are in line with what was my fuzzy view of the culture, and it's very nice to have these concrete reference points and examples. (I am also very tempted to use this proof of the theorema egregium in my class!) Thanks again.
Mar
8
revised How useful/pervasive are differential forms in surface theory?
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Mar
8
revised How useful/pervasive are differential forms in surface theory?
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8
revised How useful/pervasive are differential forms in surface theory?
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Mar
8
asked How useful/pervasive are differential forms in surface theory?
Feb
13
accepted How hard is it to determine if a weighted graph can be isometrically embedded in R^3?
Feb
11
comment How hard is it to determine if a weighted graph can be isometrically embedded in R^3?
Great. (And thanks for some very interesting pointers.) So to summarize crudely: for general graphs it is hard but there are relaxations; for convex triangulated surfaces it can be solved efficiently for approximation but is hard or impossible to do exactly. No statement on the difficulty of finding approximate solutions for nonconvex surfaces.
Feb
9
comment How hard is it to determine if a weighted graph can be isometrically embedded in R^3?
(E.g., in Figure 1 the extrinsic length of the arc will match the intrinsic length of the corresponding edge.)
Feb
9
comment How hard is it to determine if a weighted graph can be isometrically embedded in R^3?
Nice paper! But here the distance they consider is the geodesic rather than Euclidean distance induced by the embedding, no?
Feb
9
comment How hard is it to determine if a weighted graph can be isometrically embedded in R^3?
P.S. Yes, I mean a triangulated surface.