690 reputation
1720
bio website
location France
age 32
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 55 mins ago

I'm a former student in physics fond of number theory, especially Hilbert's 8th problem, further generalizations of the Riemann Hypothesis and almost everything related to prime numbers and L Functions. I'm also interested in Galois Theory even though I still don't know much about it.


Oct
19
comment is there an analogy between fractals and automorphic forms?
Thank you very much for the reference. I'll try to order this book so as to have it for my birthday on November 3rd :-)
Oct
19
asked is there an analogy between fractals and automorphic forms?
Oct
15
comment what would be the consequences on the distribution of primes of $\Lambda=\infty$?
Thank you very much for this wonderful answer. By the way, as English is not my mother tongue, can you tell me whether the spelling "zeros" is correct or not? I've had a doubt about it for quite a long time.
Oct
15
accepted what would be the consequences on the distribution of primes of $\Lambda=\infty$?
Oct
15
asked what would be the consequences on the distribution of primes of $\Lambda=\infty$?
Sep
27
comment Special values of $\zeta$ outside the real line and the critical strip
I'd say ordinates rather than abscissae.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
23
accepted is $x_{n}\ll \overline{x}_{n}^{2}$?
Sep
23
comment is $x_{n}\ll \overline{x}_{n}^{2}$?
Thank you but does your proposed counterexample meet the requirement $n.\overline{x}_{n}\ll_{\varepsilon} n^{1+\varepsilon}$ for all $\varepsilon\gt 0$? It doesn't look obvious to me.
Sep
23
comment is $x_{n}\ll \overline{x}_{n}^{2}$?
Not necessarily, indeed.
Sep
23
comment is $x_{n}\ll \overline{x}_{n}^{2}$?
$x\ll y$ means the same thing as $x=O(y)$. I added the number theory tags as number theorists are rather familiar with this notation, and the terms of the sequence I consider are positive integers.
Sep
23
asked is $x_{n}\ll \overline{x}_{n}^{2}$?
Sep
20
comment About Goldbach's conjecture
I did manage to establish the relation $r_{0}(n)=O(\log^{4} n)$ in my blog ideasfornumbertheory.wordpress.com. I don't know yet whether it implies the desired upper bound for $\alpha_{n}$ or not though.
Aug
6
revised About Goldbach's conjecture
added 207 characters in body
Aug
5
accepted Best error terms for functions related to square free numbers
Aug
5
comment The shortest interval for which the prime number theorem holds
My Robert&Collins dictionary confirms that the noun needs an 's'. It's the first time (and probably the last too) that I'm right against Terence Tao, but unfortunately not in number theory...
Aug
5
comment The shortest interval for which the prime number theorem holds
Aside any mathematical consideration, and even though English is not my mother tongue, it seems that 'heuristic' is an adjective whereas the corresponding noun is 'heuristics' with an 's' as in 'physics'. Apart from that this question appears to be very interesting and I would be thrilled to learn that the considered heuristics would finally turn out to be correct.
Aug
5
comment The shortest interval for which the prime number theorem holds
Simply a given non trivial zero of a given primitive L-function F should be analogous to an algebraic number determining its minimal polynomial and its different conjugates, which would be the other non trivial zeros of F in this analogy.
Aug
5
asked Best error terms for functions related to square free numbers
Aug
5
comment The shortest interval for which the prime number theorem holds
I know, but Haseo Ki et al. suggest in an article about the unicity of l-functions in the extended Selberg class that it is likely that no two such L-functions share a non trivial zero. This would mean that a single non trivial zero determines entirely an l-function, and thus its non trivial zeros may depend on one another in some way. Moreover I shall give an argument in favor of the conjecture above when I'm back home.