753 reputation
1720
bio website
location France
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 4 hours ago

I'm a former student in physics fond of number theory, especially Hilbert's 8th problem, further generalizations of the Riemann Hypothesis and almost everything related to prime numbers and L Functions. I'm also interested in Galois Theory even though I still don't know much about it.


Jan
29
comment Is there a hidden symmetry in the prime numbers distribution?
Even though my not-that-smart phone has a display issue, you may have misunderstood something. There is absolutely no possibility for an even integer $m$ to fulfill $r_{0}(m)=12$, since the only even prime number is $2$. Maybe you meant $spr(m)=12$?
Jan
28
asked Is there a hidden symmetry in the prime numbers distribution?
Jan
25
answered Shortest/Most elegant proof for $L(1,\chi)\neq 0$
Jan
24
accepted Rankin-Selberg convolution and product of degrees
Jan
24
comment Rankin-Selberg convolution and product of degrees
I totally agree with GH from MO.
Jan
24
asked Rankin-Selberg convolution and product of degrees
Jan
22
accepted Has this formula about prime gaps already been conjectured and/or proven?
Jan
22
revised Has this formula about prime gaps already been conjectured and/or proven?
edited title
Jan
22
asked Has this formula about prime gaps already been conjectured and/or proven?
Jan
22
answered japanese/chinese for mathematicians?
Jan
20
comment Under what conditions $\|x-y\|=n\iff\|f(x)-f(y)\|=n.$ for $n\in\mathbf{N}$ implies isometry?
Ok, that makes sense. I'm not able to answer your question but I found it rather useful to get it clarified.
Jan
19
comment Under what conditions $\|x-y\|=n\iff\|f(x)-f(y)\|=n.$ for $n\in\mathbf{N}$ implies isometry?
This question is interesting but I think it lacks a quantifier. Do you require your equality to hold for all $n\in\mathbb{N}$ or just for some $n$?
Jan
13
comment Does the proportion of non trivial zeroes of given real part increase on [0,1/2] for all L-functions?
Yes. But as $T$ increases, the width of each rectangle gets smaller, getting "infinitesimal" as $T$ tends to $\infty$ (because we don't know a priori the possible abscissae of non trivial zeroes of $F$ so that we can't really ignore any value of $x\in [0,1/2]$ without a good reason to do so).
Jan
13
comment Does the proportion of non trivial zeroes of given real part increase on [0,1/2] for all L-functions?
If I understand well, I took the limit as $T$ tends to $\infty$ too early? Would I be better off considering first a simple function depending on $T$, which may be increasing on $[0,1/2]$ for $T$ large enough, and considering the limit as $T$ tends to $\infty$ at the very last step?
Jan
13
comment Does the proportion of non trivial zeroes of given real part increase on [0,1/2] for all L-functions?
I'm afraid you're right. Kind of feel naughty surreal numbers lurking behind me...Is there a way to prevent the whole ship from sinking?
Jan
13
revised Does the proportion of non trivial zeroes of given real part increase on [0,1/2] for all L-functions?
added a missing dollar sign
Jan
13
revised Does the proportion of non trivial zeroes of given real part increase on [0,1/2] for all L-functions?
changed the definition of the star product used here
Jan
13
revised Does the proportion of non trivial zeroes of given real part increase on [0,1/2] for all L-functions?
defined the precise notion of convolution used here
Jan
13
revised Does the proportion of non trivial zeroes of given real part increase on [0,1/2] for all L-functions?
slightly changed the definition of $\delta_{F}$
Jan
13
revised Does the proportion of non trivial zeroes of given real part increase on [0,1/2] for all L-functions?
added another question