1,107 reputation
1025
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Jan 29 '13 at 6:14

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Mar
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
10
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
3
awarded  Yearling
Jun
25
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
24
awarded  Notable Question
May
13
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
24
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
15
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
16
awarded  Enthusiast
Dec
9
comment An algebra of “integrals”
Thanks! What if I just want this $T$ be defined on just a subspace? 1 is translational invariant, that certainly gives some trouble. ($\sin x$ seems to give similar trouble if one translate it by $\pi$.)
Dec
8
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
8
revised An algebra of “integrals”
clarified a bit.
Dec
8
comment An algebra of “integrals”
I don't insist having something over $\mathbb{R}$. I just want to see if these kind of things may work.
Dec
8
revised An algebra of “integrals”
added 17 characters in body; edited title
Dec
8
revised An algebra of “integrals”
added 146 characters in body; edited tags
Dec
7
comment Groups that do not exist
@Arturo, thanks for the correction, but I cannot edit the comment :(.
Dec
7
comment Groups that do not exist
Great question. I wanted to ask something related, namely, what do we learn from those arguments that shows finite simple groups of a certain order does not exist? Those thing appear in abstract algebra course bothers beginners, and I'm not sure how useful they are for the training of a mathematician. (e.g. there cannot be a simple group of order 112, and it does not easily follow from Sylow theorems, but what's the point? (It does follow from the $p^aq^b$ theorem of Frobenius though.))