1,639 reputation
1921
bio website blog.mikael.johanssons.org
location Stanford
age 34
visits member for 5 years, 1 month
seen Sep 30 at 20:07
Postdoctoral researcher in applied and computational algebraic topology at Stanford. PhD thesis research was on the computation of $A_\infty$ algebra structures in group cohomology.

Oct
9
awarded  Yearling
Jul
16
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
15
comment Bounded convolutions with binomial coefficients
No, this is unrelated to the tie-knot thing; it's for a complexity analysis of an algorithm.
Feb
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
13
answered Bounded convolutions with binomial coefficients
Feb
13
asked Bounded convolutions with binomial coefficients
Nov
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
5
comment Intuitionistic algebraic topology?
The context I'm working on is, to be more exact, what happens if I do topology internal to a particular topos of sheaves.
Nov
4
asked Intuitionistic algebraic topology?
Oct
9
awarded  Yearling
Oct
4
awarded  Caucus
Jun
25
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jan
10
answered Question about getting Review services
Dec
27
answered Why is a ring called a “ring”?
Dec
5
answered Persistent homology of Gaussian Fields in Euclidean space
Nov
25
comment From complexity to topology after a CS PhD
In particular, by stepping stone I mean to look for computational topologists who are interested in more complexity knowhow in their own workgroups, and use your participation in a postdoc in such a group as a way to bootstrap yourself into computational topology. After 2-3 years you'll be prolific in your new field instead. It is a gamble, but it is far from impossible.
Nov
25
comment From complexity to topology after a CS PhD
I shifted after my PhD: from computational homological algebra to computational and applied algebraic topology. It took several years, and I have yet to see if my career eventually benefitted from it, but if anything I'd recommend trying to get contacts now to help you through, and to make your postdoc time a stepping stone for the shift.
Nov
12
comment A generalization of a group isomorphism.
Does $a=h\text{coker}(k)$ even exist? It seems to me that $\text{coker}(k)$ should be a subobject of $G$, while $h$ takes input from $H$.