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Apr
28
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
25
revised Generalization of the rigidity lemma in birational geometry
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Apr
21
revised Generalization of the rigidity lemma in birational geometry
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Apr
21
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
15
answered Canonical module of a Buchsbaum ring
Apr
14
comment Non-uniqueness of smooth compactification
OK, cool. Cheers. :)
Apr
14
comment Non-uniqueness of smooth compactification
@Mikhail: I'm sorry, but what I meant was that in my opinion this is not what the question was. One could mention more traditional facts in this regard, for example that Hodge theory of $U$ is (usually) computed via choosing a $Y$ such that $Y\setminus U$ is an snc divisor, but the result is independent of the actual $Y$. In some sense, if I understand correctly, this is sort of the same thing as what you are saying. Yet, $Y$ itself is still not unique.
Apr
14
answered Uniqueness of smooth compactification upto a smooth morphism
Apr
8
answered Is locally freeness of a sheaf (of fixed rank) around a divisor detectable from a first order neighbourhood?
Apr
3
revised The localization of a regular local ring is regular
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Apr
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
29
comment Gauss proof of fundamental theorem of algebra
@JonP: One possible interpretation is that a projective algebraic curve is a closed subset of the projective plane, hence it is compact. So (working over the real numbers), if it does not intersect the line at infinity, then it is a bounded closed curve which one might call "coming back to itself".
Mar
29
comment Gauss proof of fundamental theorem of algebra
@FedorPetrov: I don't think that's what He means. It sounds more like thinking of the curve as we usually draw one: there is a point where we start drawing and there is one where we end. Those are the two sides. If they meet, the curve "comes back to itself" if they don't, then you could keep continuing with drawing in either direction="both sides". By the way, this sounds like an argument over the reals. Over the complex numbers every algebraic curve "goes to infinity"....
Mar
20
revised “Anticanonical sections” on singular varieties
added 134 characters in body
Mar
7
comment Classification of cubic surfaces in $\mathbb{P}^3$
Look at [Hartshorne, V.4].
Mar
4
revised Automorphisms of singular varieties
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Mar
4
comment Automorphisms of singular varieties
Come on, ACL, this is not an article, you can't possibly expect me to properly attribute every single notion in an MO answer. The question was not "Who came up with this idea first?". When I write [reference] I mean that you can click on it, it tells you a place where it is stated. I thought it was useful to tell people what I actually mean by that word. I didn't say the result was Kollár's just that it can be found in that book.
Mar
4
comment Automorphisms of singular varieties
@Mark: You are right. But (I think) so am I! I wrote this hastily, but it is not wrong, just as it was it did not quite answer the question or more kindly put it did not have quite enough details. I think it is better now. Cheers!
Mar
4
revised Automorphisms of singular varieties
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