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awarded  Famous Question
Jun
26
comment How did “normal” come to mean “perpendicular”?
@Emil Jeřábek o̯ is the laryngeal, ĝ is "palatal" or something(nobody knows what it was in reality). The later notation is common (e.g. as in Mallory & Adams, Fortson etc), so what are you referring to as "common notation"?
Jun
26
comment How did “normal” come to mean “perpendicular”?
@jnovacho yes, the both are from PIE root o̯reĝ- (o̯reĝtos = right, correct, o̯reĝti = guides, directs, o̯reĝs = king, o̯reĝi̯om = kingdom etc)
Jun
26
comment How did “normal” come to mean “perpendicular”?
Can I suggest this to be moved to Linguistics.SE?
Jun
24
revised The functional equation $f(f(x))=x+f(x)^2$
added 1 character in body
Jun
24
revised The functional equation $f(f(x))=x+f(x)^2$
deleted 4 characters in body
Jun
20
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
Oh sorry, I see
Jun
18
revised If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
fix wording
Jun
18
suggested suggested edit on If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
Jun
17
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
So it is good to know that this somehow touches your prevuous research.
Jun
17
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
I doubt that is accurate for someone who has theorems in textbooks named after him.
Jun
17
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
Sorry I would not ask this, should I know that you're a renowned mathematician. Still your proof is explained in too difficult language at least for me to comprehend.
Jun
17
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
I have accepted this answer, although I would prefer it be posted in the linked question. Can you please tell, did you derive this theorem yourself or had you seen it before?
Jun
17
accepted If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
Jun
17
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
@fedja What's up with the proof? Can we resonably hope to see it?
Jun
15
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
@fedja if you have a link to this property as you stated, this would be a great answer to this question, at least the first part: mathoverflow.net/questions/71206/discrete-analytic-functions
Jun
15
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
@fedja how do u know that the Newton series for such function converges?
Jun
15
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
@fedja $\sin (\frac{\pi x}{2})$ is entire function? Yes. I suppose its order is less than 1. It does not have convergent Newton series. See here: mathoverflow.net/questions/99166/…
Jun
15
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
@fedja by the way, another question is, will a non-zero function which vanishes at any square of integer have its Newton series converging?
Jun
15
comment If two functions are equal to their Newton series, is their composition also equal to its Newton series?
@fedja interesting, but at what conditions it holds then?