Hypergeometric functions are the analytic functions defined by Taylor expansions of the shape $\sum_{n \geq 0} a_n x^n$, where $a_{n+1}/a_n$ is a rational function of $n$. This general family of functions encompasses many classical functions. The hypergeometric functions play an important role in ...

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Closed-form for modified formal power series

This question have been driving me crazy for months now. This comes from work on multiple integrals and convolutions but is phrased in terms of formal power series. We start with a formal power ...
6
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852 views

A 2F1 Hypergeometric identity from a Feynman integral

Using two different approaches to evaluating the dimensionally regularized ($d=4-2\epsilon$ dimensional Euclidean space), equal mass ($x=m^2$), 2-loop vacuum Feynman diagram $$ \begin{align} I(x) ...
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Limit of two hypergeometric functions (2F1)

Hi, Does anyone know whether there is a known function/distribution that corresponds to the limit: $\lim_{\epsilon\rightarrow0^+} \mathfrak{Re}\left[f(x+i\epsilon) - f(x-i\epsilon)\right]$ when ...
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Why are hypergeometric series important and do they have a geometric or heuristic motivation?

Apart from telling that the hypergeometric functions (or series) are the solutions to the (essentially unique?) fuchsian equation on the Riemann sphere with 3 "regular singular points", the wikipedia ...
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Groups, quantum groups and (fill in the blank)

In the study of special functions there are three levels of objects, classical, basic and elliptic. These correspond to classical hypergeometric functions, basic (q-) hypergeometric functions, and ...
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252 views

hypergeometric closed form for z=1/4,-1/3

There exist the linear identities for the 2f1 hypergeometric function where z is either -1, 1, or 1/2 using the quadratic transdormations it is easy to derive new identities in terms of gamma ...
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2answers
374 views

Analytic continuation of $_4F_3(1)$

The Gauss theorem $${_2F_1}(a,b;c;1)=\frac{\Gamma(c-a)\Gamma(c-b)}{\Gamma(c)\Gamma(c-a-b)}$$ allows to compute the analytic continuation of ${_2F_1}(a,b;c;1)$ for $a+b>c$ when the series ...
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Relation between two hypergeometric series

EDIT: Context for this investigation can be found in one of my other MO posts, "Pythagorean Theorem for Right-Corner Hyperbolic Simplices?" -- I'm investigating a function that has led me to this ...
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Curious $q$-analogues

Consider the Fibonacci polynomials $$F_n (x) = \sum_{j = 0}^{\left\lfloor {n/2} \right\rfloor }\binom{n-j}{j} x^{n - 2j} $$ and the Lucas polynomials $$L_n (x) = \sum_{j = 0}^{\left\lfloor {n/2} ...
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3answers
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Recent work on hypergeometric functions

Does anyone know of a monograph/survey on the modern history of (basic or elliptic) hypergeometric functions and their applications? I haven't had much time to search the literature, and because it ...
11
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2answers
758 views

Positivity of sequences via generating series

There are different ways of showing that a given sequence $a_0,a_1,a_2,\dots$ of integers, say, is nonnegative. For example, one can show that $a_n$ count something, or express $a_n$ as a (multiple) ...
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1answer
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Is there a closed form for this hypergeometric expression?

I am trying to compute the number of distinct ways a $4n$ $\times$ $4n$ chessboard can be colored black and white, with exactly half the squares black and half the squares white. By distinct, I mean ...
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A (known?) hypergeometric identity

Incidentally I've obtained a hypergeometric identity that I've not seen before: $${}_3F_2(-m,-n,m+n; 1, 1; 1) = \frac{m^2+n^2+mn}{(m+n)^2} {\binom{m+n}{m}}^2$$ So, I wonder if it is well-known and ...
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1answer
392 views

“Closed” form for Motzkin and related numbers

I wonder whether it is impossible to write the nth Motzkin number as a sum of a fixed number of, say, hypergeometric terms. To illustrate what I mean: $n!+(2n)!$ is not a hypergeometric term, but it ...
32
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4answers
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Integer-valued factorial ratios

This historical question recalls Pafnuty Chebyshev's estimates for the prime distribution function. In his derivation Chebyshev used the factorial ratio sequence $$ ...
13
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1answer
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Binomial supercongruences: is there any reason for them?

One of the recent questions, in fact the answer to it, reminded me about the binomial sequence $$ a_n=\sum_{k=0}^n{\binom{n}{k}}^2{\binom{n+k}{k}}^2, \qquad n=0,1,2,\dots, $$ of the Apéry ...
18
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4answers
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Are the q-Catalan numbers q-holonomic?

The generating function $f(z)$ of the Catalan numbers which is characterized by $f(z)=1+zf(z)^2$ is D-finite, or holonomic, i.e. it satisfies a linear differential equation with polynomial ...
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3answers
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Recursions which define polynomials

There are many examples (Somos sequences, special polynomials related to rational solutions of the Painleve equations) when a recurrence relation, which a priori produces a sequence of rational ...