Euclidean geometry is a mathematical system attributed to the Alexandrian Greek mathematician Euclid, which he described in his textbook on geometry: the Elements. Euclid's method consists in assuming a small set of intuitively appealing axioms, and deducing many other propositions (theorems) from ...

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0answers
204 views

Finite subgroups of the unimodular group

This is related to this MO question (and others as well). Hoping that this will not turn out to be too broad, I would like to know about the 'state of the art' of: 1) The problem of classifying ...
6
votes
4answers
792 views

Isomorphic but non-conjugate subgroups of $GL(n,\mathbb{Z})$ ?

I've been asked some questions by a friend interested in crystallography, and the following questions (I'm not an expert) came spontaneous to me: 1) Are there two finite subgroups $P,P'\subset\...
6
votes
1answer
299 views

Reorienting a ladder among $\mathbb{Z}^2$ poles

Imagine an object, which I'll call a ladder $\cal{L}$, a "racetrack" shape composed of a rectangle of length $L$ capped at either end by semicircles of radius $r$; so it is $L+2r$ tip-to-tip. View ...
5
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1answer
760 views

theorems equivalent to the parallel postulate

Is there a good survey article listing all the theorems of Euclidean geometry that are equivalent to the parallel postulate?
3
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0answers
286 views

Minimum solid angle and aspect ratio of an $n$-simplex

In computational geometry and other fields, it is of interest to have degeneracy measures for shapes of simplices, which quantitatively seperate the regular simplex from degenerate simplices. In two ...
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vote
2answers
336 views

Triangles with Congruent Corresponding Sides that Cannot fold into a Tetrahedron

I've been trying to find, without much success, 4 triangles whose corresponding sides are congruent that cannot be folded into a tetrahedron. Anyone has any clue how to approach this problem?
6
votes
0answers
1k views

Interpolating points with minimum curvature constraint

I have $n$ points $p_i$ strictly interior to a rectangle $R$, and I would like to connect them with a curve $C$ whose curvature is as low as possible. Let $\kappa_\max(C)$ be the sharpest (largest ...
21
votes
4answers
994 views

Pinball on the infinite plane

Imagine pinball on the infinite plane, with every lattice point $\mathbb{Z}^2$ a point pin. The ball has radius $r < \frac{1}{2}$. It starts just touching the origin pin, and shoots off at angle $\...
0
votes
1answer
423 views

Action of Isometries on a Line in the Plane

I'm trying to determine the stabilizer of a line in a plane when acted upon by the group of isometries of the plane. Please note that I'm using the notation found in the Wikipedia article on Euclidean ...
0
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0answers
164 views

Inertia/Gravity in Distance Geometry

The Cayley-Menger Determinant, D(N), slickly calculates the N-dimensional simplex volume of any N+1 points. One constraint in our 3D world is that D(4)=0. Give each point a mass (Mi) and dynamic ...
10
votes
1answer
592 views

Polygons uniquely inducing arrangements

A beautiful, relatively recent result is that, Every simple arrangement $\cal{A}$ of $n$ lines in the plane is induced by a simple $n$-gon $P$. In a simple arrangement, every pair of lines ...
14
votes
1answer
579 views

Ratio of circumscribed/inscribed $(n{-}1)$-gons

As a discrete analog of the MO question, "Löwner-John Ellipsoid: incribed and circumscribed," I've been wondering what might be the maximum ratio of this quantity? Let $P$ be a convex polygon of $n$ ...
5
votes
1answer
362 views

What can be said about number-theoretic properties of the solid angle measures of polytopal cones in the weight lattice of sl(n)?

The following question might be elementary — it is too far from my area of expertise to tell. It has shown up in my research in an interesting way, which I will not go into here, but I'm happy to ...
13
votes
2answers
609 views

Maximum thickness of three linked Euclidean solid tori

Consider three circles of radius 1 in $\mathbb{R}^3$, linked with each other in the same arrangement as three fibers of the Hopf fibration. Now thicken the circles up into non-overlapping standard ...
10
votes
0answers
1k views

3-piece dissection of square to equilateral triangle?

At a workshop it was suggested that it likely remains an open problem whether or not there is a 3- or 2 -piece dissection of a square to an equilateral triangle. Can anyone confirm that this is ...
0
votes
1answer
195 views

Special functions on the unit disk

Let $\mathbb{D} = \{ (x,y) \in \mathbb{R}^2 \mid x^2 + y^2 < 1 \}$ be the unit disk. We say a function $f : \mathbb{D} \rightarrow \mathbb{D}$ is a winner if it satisfies the following: 1) it is a ...
3
votes
2answers
502 views

Covering a sphere using reflections of an intersection of three lunes

I have been trying to figure this problem out for a while, and while I believe someone must have figured it out hundreds of years ago, I still can't quite get it. Suppose we have a 3-dimensional ...
17
votes
8answers
2k views

Determine if circle is covered by some set of other circles

Suppose you have a set of circles $\mathcal{C} = \{ C_1, \ldots, C_n \}$ each with a fixed radius $r$ but varying centre coordinates. Next, you are given a new circle $C_{n+1}$ with the same radius $r$...
12
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1answer
1k views

What is the limit of the “knight” distance on finer and finer chessboards?

Consider the "infinite chessboard" on the plane. Think of it as the lattice $X_1:=\mathbb{Z}^2$, and also finer chessboards $X_n$ corresponding to $\frac{1}{n}\cdot \mathbb{Z}^2$, $n\geq 1$. Given two ...
3
votes
6answers
1k views

Circumference of Convex Shapes

Here is a puzzle I found in Mitteilungen der DMV (roughly, "Letters of the German Society of Mathematicians"), issue 19/2011. It was posed by Alfred Schreiber in "Wie man Hasen fangt" (How to catch ...
11
votes
3answers
901 views

(1-Lipschitz) + (length-preserving) = isometry

I am looking for an elementary way to prove the following theorem. Theorem. Let $\alpha$ and $\beta$ be two simple convex closed curves in $\mathbb R^2$. Assume $$\mathop{\rm length} \alpha=\...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

How to solve geometry problems using involutions

Some geometry problems ( like this and this ) have short solutions if we use involutions. What references are there for solving geometry problems using involutions? I am particularly interested in ...
16
votes
2answers
1k views

Why do all incidence theorems follow from Pappus' theorem?

In Hilbert and Cohn-Vossen's ``Geometry and the Imagination," they state in the last paragraph of Chapter 20 that "Any theorems concerned solely with incidence relations in the [Euclidean projective]...
12
votes
4answers
11k views

The Ramanujan Problems.

I originally thought of asking this question at the Mathematics Stackexchange, but then I decided that I'd have a better chance of a good discussion here. In the Wikipedia page on Ramanujan, there is ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Quadrilateral from 4 random points

Given 4 random points in 2D, how do I compute the area of the quadrilateral formed by the points? I'm aware of formulae giving the area when I know the sides a,b,c,d and the diagonals p & q. But ...
-1
votes
1answer
428 views

Meeting point of the vertices of a square cloth on x-y plane

Consider a standard square sheet lying on the xy plane with edge length n. Is it possible to determine the coordinates (x, y, z) of the point where the vertices of the sheet will meet, when each of ...
23
votes
3answers
2k views

An elementary problem in Euclidean geometry [closed]

This problem was first put to me by Luke Pebody (who did not know the answer at the time) and after some work I am yet to find a proof or counterexample. I would be grateful of any insights. Call a ...
12
votes
3answers
886 views

Efficient visibility blockers in Polya's orchard problem

Polya's orchard problem asks for which radius $\rho$ of trees at each lattice point within a distance $R$ of the origin block all lines of sight to the exterior of the orchard.     ...
7
votes
1answer
966 views

Geometric meaning of trigonometric relations

According to a paper by Zhiqin Lu in the Mathematical Gazette (the British publication, not the Boston-area newsletter, if that still exists (or even if it doesn't)) in 2007(?), if $u+v+w=\pi$ and $a,...
10
votes
2answers
475 views

Helix translates as geodesics

I believe one can fill $\mathbb{R}^3$ with horizontal translates of the helix $(\cos t, \sin t, t) \;,\; t \in \mathbb{R}$, so that every point of $\mathbb{R}^3$ lies in exactly one helix. I am ...
5
votes
2answers
333 views

Generalization of plane geometric trees?

View a plane tree drawn in $\mathbb{R}^2$ as a joining of geometric (straight) segments at endpoints such that (a) they avoid intersecting one another (except where they share a vertex), and (b) they ...
2
votes
1answer
179 views

Subspace of $\mathbb{R}^n$ spanned by the image of convex $(n-1)$-polyhedra under the face-counting map

Fix $n \in \mathbb{N}$. A convex polyhedron $C$ in $\mathbb{R}^n$ is the convex hull of finitely many points with nonempty interior. For $H$ a supporting hyperplane, ie $C$ is contained in one of the ...
18
votes
3answers
1k views

Angle of a regular simplex

I find the following question embarrassing, but I have not been able to either resolve it, or to find a reference. What is the vertex angle of a regular $n$-simplex? Background: For a vertex $v$ ...
34
votes
14answers
8k views

Open problems in Euclidean geometry?

Which are some (research level) open problems in Euclidean geometry ? (Edit: I ask just out of curiosity, to understand how -and if- nowadays this is not a "dead" field yet) I should clarify a bit ...
5
votes
2answers
559 views

Can we alter the axioms of Euclidean space to have $\mathbb{Q}^3$ as a unique model?

I posted this question at math.stackexchange.com but didn't get an answer. Motivation Physicists are in search for a model of discrete space(-time) for a long time. So I wondered why not start with ...
3
votes
0answers
325 views

Characterizations of Euclidean space

I posted this question at math.stackexchange.com but didn't get an answer. Is it a dumb question, eventually? There are three ways of characterizing the abstract Euclidean space $E^n$ that are quite ...
10
votes
6answers
713 views

Decomposing the plane into intervals

I posted this on Stack Exchange and got a lot of interest, but no answer. A recent Missouri State problem stated that it is easy to decompose the plane into half-open intervals and asked us to do so ...
6
votes
1answer
514 views

Using mirrors to make a non-convex polygon visible from a fixed interior point

Take a point $A$ inside a non-convex polygon $P$. Is it always possible to place a finite set of mirrors given by straight segments (not necessarily along the boundary of $P$, any position inside $P$ ...
3
votes
1answer
507 views

Is always possible to slice a pizza in a fair way

Given a pizza, represented by the unit disk $D_1(0,0)=\{(x,y)\in\mathbb{R}^2\mid \|(x,y)\|\leqslant 1\}$, and given $N$ slices of $r$-pepperoni, represented by disks $D_r(a_i,b_i)=\{(x,y)\in\mathbb{R}^...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

Point cloud that maximizes the minimum pairwise distance in Euclidean space

I am interested finding the collection of points in the Euclidean space that has the maximal minimal pairwise distance subject to an average norm constraint, that is, how to maximize $min_{i \neq j} |...
5
votes
1answer
597 views

Elementary problem about triangles inside a convex polygon

Let P be a convex polygon with area A(P), and to each side of P, attach the largest area triangle possible that lies entirely within P. Must the sum S(P) of the areas of these triangles always satisfy ...
9
votes
3answers
893 views

Neusis constructions

Is there some simple description of which complex numbers are "constructible" with straightedge and compass and neusis? See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constructible_number and http://en.wikipedia....
13
votes
11answers
8k views

Theorems in Euclidean geometry with attractive proofs using more advanced methods

The butterfly theorem is notoriously tricky to prove using only "high-school geometry" but it can be proved elegantly once you think in terms of projective geometry, as explained in Ruelle's book The ...
19
votes
6answers
3k views

Euclid with Birkhoff

I'm looking for an short and elementary book which does Euclidean geomety with Birkhoff's axioms. It would be best if it would also include some topics in projective (and/or) hyperbolic geometry. ...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

Maximum number of mutually equidistant points in an n-dimensional Euclidean space is (n+1). Proof? [closed]

How to prove that the maximum number of mutually equidistant points in an n-dimensional Euclidean space is (n+1)?
8
votes
1answer
610 views

Sticks and thread

In this recent question Math puzzles for dinner we had a nice time as we were asked to provide new maths puzzles for dinners. I suggested the following: Given three equal sticks, and some thread,...
54
votes
11answers
7k views

Geometric proof of the Vandermonde determinant?

The Vandermonde matrix is the $n\times n$ matrix whose $(i,j)$-th component is $x_j^{i-1}$, where the $x_j$ are indeterminates. It is well known that the determinant of this matrix is $$\prod_{1\leq ...
13
votes
1answer
1k views

Origami Constructions: Intersecting two Circles

It is well known that every construction that can be performed with compass and straightedge alone can also be performed using origami, see: R. Geretschlager. Euclidean Constructions and the Geometry ...
2
votes
1answer
504 views

Reference: Countable Models of (Non-)Euclidean Geometry

Has there been a survey written on the model theory of first-order (non-)Euclidean geometry in the spirit of Hilbert and Tarski? I'm especially interested in two aspects of the model theory: ...
17
votes
6answers
1k views

Tetrahedra with prescribed face angles

I am looking for an analogue for the following 2 dimensional fact: Given 3 angles $\alpha,\beta,\gamma\in (0;\pi)$ there is always a triangle with these prescribed angles. It is spherical/euclidean/...