computable sets and functions, Turing degrees, c.e. degrees, models of computability, primitive recursion, oracle computation, models of computability, decision problems, undecidability, Turing jump, halting problem, notions of computable randomness, computable model theory, computable equivalence ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms

5
votes
2answers
259 views

Complexity of Turing Machine behavior

If one looks at the code for a Turing Machine (TM) with $q$ states and, let's say, $2$ symbols, they all look pretty much the same: A list of $5$-tuples: $$ < state, symbol{-}read, ...
8
votes
1answer
283 views

How long does the slow inefficient algorithm for computing the product in classical Laver tables take?

Let $(A_{n},*)$ denote the $n$-th classical Laver table. Let $X_{n}$ be the set of all finite sequences of elements from $A_{n}$. Define a function $E_{n}:X_{n}\rightarrow X_{n}$ by letting ...
7
votes
2answers
334 views

Decidability of diophantine equation in a theory

Given a theory $T \subseteq \operatorname{Th}(\mathbb{N})$, define the decision problem $D_T$ as follows: Given a polynomial $p$ with integer coefficients and variables $\bar{x}$, decide whether ...
4
votes
5answers
7k views

Prove a function is primitive recursive

Hey, I'm taking a course in computability theory, but I'm struggling with primitive recursion. More specifically we are often asked to prove that some arbitrary function is primitive recursive, but I ...
6
votes
0answers
104 views

A way to smooth out the log* function?

I have seen here and there discussions about what is the "correct" way of extending the Ackermann function to the reals (the same way the Gamma function extends the factorial function to the reals). ...
3
votes
1answer
174 views

Inverse Ackermann Function

The inverse Ackermann function is defined over the natural numbers as follows: ($[x]$ means that we round up x to the nearest integer, while $\log^*$ is the iterated log function discussed here: ...
15
votes
4answers
2k views

Languages beyond enumerable

A language is a set of finite-length strings from some finite alphabet $\Sigma$. It is no loss of generality (for my purposes) to take $\Sigma=\{0,1\}$; so a language is a set of bit-strings. ...
7
votes
2answers
361 views

Difference between constructive Dedekind and Cauchy reals in computation

If the Axiom of Countable Choice (ACC) $$ \forall n\in \mathbb{N} . \exists x \in X . \varphi [n, x] \implies \exists f: \mathbb{N} \longrightarrow X . \forall n \in \mathbb{N} . \varphi [n, f(n)] $$ ...
6
votes
1answer
324 views

Current status of computable spectral theorem and interpretation of quantum mechanics

The spectral theorem states if $A$ is a Hermitian operator acting on an $n-$dimensional Hilbert space space $H$, and $\lambda_1, ... \lambda_m$ are $m \leq n$ distinct eigenvalues of $A$, then $$ ...
3
votes
3answers
163 views

Coproducts and “Error Conditions” in Math vs CS

First, some background: recently in learning more about functional programming I saw one use for coproducts that surprised me a little bit: A function $f: A \rightarrow B \coprod C$ may result when ...
4
votes
2answers
215 views

(non-)existence of the aperiodic monotile

The aperiodic monotile problem asks whether there exists a single tile that every tiling of the plane made with it results non-periodic. What is known about this problem? If this tile exists, how can ...
2
votes
0answers
115 views

When do wide initial segments ruin admissibility?

Suppose $\alpha$ is admissible and $\beta<\alpha$. We know that $L_\alpha$ is an admissible set (by definition), but adding subsets of $\beta$ to $L_\alpha$ might break admissibility: while set ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Comparing product of positive affine functions over integers

Problem Let $f_i: \mathbb Z^n \mapsto \mathbb Z$ and $g_i: \mathbb Z^n \mapsto \mathbb Z$ affine functions and $\mathcal D \subseteq \mathbb Z^n$ a set on which they are all positive. Let $P$ and $Q$ ...
4
votes
1answer
93 views

Are these two definitions of arithmetical hierarchy of real numbers equivalent?

Zheng and Weihrauch (http://www-sst.informatik.tu-cottbus.de/~wwwti/zheng/publications/1999/mfcs99.pdf) define a real number $x$ to be $\Sigma_n$ if and only if there is a computable function ...
12
votes
1answer
634 views

Continuous functions and 2-bushy trees

The following problem was asked by Joe Miller in the fall of 2010 at a bar in Madison. A subtree $T \subseteq 4^{< \omega}$ is $2$-bushy if for some node $\sigma \in T$, every node above $\sigma$ ...
1
vote
1answer
486 views

Can Turing machines clarify mathematical, philosophical, and physical existence?

From Harvey Friedman's manuscript on "Order Invariant Relations and Incompleteness": DEFINITION 4.4. A $\Pi_1^0$ sentence is a sentence asserting that some given Turing machine never halts at the ...
6
votes
1answer
254 views

Finding limit-nondecreasing sets for certain functions

This is a question that arose a while ago in work with Damir Dzhafarov on some pieces of reverse mathematics. As far as I know, it has no deep significance; however, it feels like the sort of thing we ...
11
votes
1answer
296 views

Is ordinal arithmetic more complicated than classical arithmetic?

Consider the first-order language $\mathcal{L}_{\text{OA}}:=(+,\cdot,0,1)$; in this language, we can formulate statements of ordinal arithmetic. Clearly, the theory $T_{\text{OA}}$ of ...
3
votes
1answer
134 views

Theories of arithmetic from recursively inseparable sets

Edit: all sets / theories considered below are supposed to be recursively enumerable, although I'd also be interested in any possible generalizations to non-enumerable theories. In the comments on ...
56
votes
8answers
6k views

Succinctly naming big numbers: ZFC versus Busy-Beaver

Years ago, I wrote an essay called Who Can Name the Bigger Number?, which posed the following challenge: You have fifteen seconds. Using standard math notation, English words, or both, name a single ...
28
votes
5answers
896 views

Does the exact pair phenomenon for partial orders occur in your area of mathematics?

Suppose that I have a partial order P and an increasing sequence $a_0< a_1<a_2<\cdots$ of elements of $P$. A pair of elements (b,c) from P is said to be an exact pair for this sequence, if ...
5
votes
1answer
165 views

Deciding isomorphism between structures which interpret in the pure set

I am interested in the following decision problem: Given descriptions of two relational structures $A,B$ which interpret in the pure set $\mathbb N=(\{0,1,2,\ldots\},=)$, decide whether $A$ and ...
2
votes
2answers
521 views

Can we compute every definable number with knowledge of the halting problem?

Suppose we knew the answer to the halting problem, and the halting problem for this new system with the old halting problem solved. And so on. Would this allow us to compute every definable number?
6
votes
2answers
156 views

a variant of the Kleene tree

The (a?) Kleene tree is a computable (a.k.a. decidable) sub-tree of the full binary tree with no computable path. It is well-known. I need a variant. (For those in the know, I need a c-bar which is ...
5
votes
1answer
124 views

“Partial-computably isomorphic” sets

For $A,B \subseteq \mathbb{N}$, define $A\sim B$ when there exist partial computable functions $f,g\colon \mathbb{N}\rightharpoonup \mathbb{N}$ such that $f$ is defined at least on all of $A$ and $g$ ...
22
votes
8answers
2k views

Between mu- and primitive recursion

It is well known that primitive recursion is not powerful enough to express all functions, Ackermann function being probably the best known example. Now, in the logic courses (that I have had look ...
16
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the relationship between Turing Machines and Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem?

In this article, Scott Aaronson talks about using Turing Machines for proving the Rosser Theorem. What is the relationship between the numbering that Gödel used in his proof of incompleteness and ...
2
votes
2answers
264 views

Time Hierarchy Theorem and P vs NP

One obvious strategy for proving P not equal to NP would be to show that there is some problem in NP which is hard for a time class strictly containing P (the origin of this question is the recent ...
0
votes
0answers
97 views

Distribution of definable integers

Consider the distribution of all formulas of length less then n which define an integer in PA. So for instance f(7,n)=number of formulas of length less then n which output 7. Or the number of steps ...
3
votes
1answer
224 views

Can we use this symbol? [closed]

We consider the ring $\mathbb{C}[e^{\lambda x} \mid \lambda \in \mathbb{C}]$ and the language $L=\{+, \cdot , \frac{d}{dx} , 0, 1\}$. The ring consists of elements of the form $$\sum_{i=0}^N ...
16
votes
1answer
1k views

Is it possible to make an algorithm that could predict the likelihood that a program will halt?

Today I began to read about computability theory. I do not even have an elementary understanding of the topic but it certainly got me thinking. I know there is there is no 'one-for-all' algorithm that ...
0
votes
0answers
147 views

Is the positive existential theory undecidable?

Could you tell if the positive existential theory of $\mathbb{C}[e^{\mu x} \mid \mu \in \mathbb{C}]$ is undecidable in the language $\{+, \cdot , \frac{d}{dx} , 0, 1, e^x\}$ ? How can we prove the ...
6
votes
1answer
140 views

Minimal degrees of structures

For this question, a structure means a first-order structure in a computable language with domain $\omega$; a copy of a structure $\mathcal{A}$ is a structure $\mathcal{B}\cong\mathcal{A}$. Given a ...
8
votes
2answers
566 views

Did Bishop, Heyting or Brouwer take partial functions seriously?

The partial μ-recursive functions which may or may not be provably total seem to have some direct relation to the initial motivations for intuitionistic mathematics. (Following Kronecker, one ...
3
votes
1answer
208 views

Is there an easy decision algorithm for the inhabitation problem for simple types?

Consider the basic system of simple types usually known as $TA_\lambda$. One can prove that (as a consequence of the Subject Reduction Property and the fact that any typable term is strongly ...
17
votes
1answer
436 views

Are compact topological $n$-manifolds recursively enumerable?

Earlier this year it was asked on MO, "Are there only countably many compact topological manifolds?" Thanks to Cheeger and Kister, the answer is yes. On the other hand, Manolescu recently debunked ...
14
votes
2answers
469 views

Can a stochastic Turing machine output a consistent extension of PA with positive probability?

Suppose that we interpret the output tape of a Turing machine as an assignment of true or false to all sentences of PA, taking the $n$th output bit as the truth value of the sentence with Goedel ...
3
votes
2answers
231 views

Comparing really big numbers

Is there an intractability theorem that says that in any sufficiently rich system for defining really big numbers, there will be two numbers for which it's very, very, ... very difficult to decide ...
5
votes
0answers
146 views

List of finitely presented groups with undecidable word problem

Is there any reasonably updated list of (representative) examples of finitely presented groups with undecidable word problem? By "representative" I mean "avoiding obvious redundancy", i.e. examples ...
2
votes
1answer
219 views

Effectively non-recursiveness of some sets

A set $A$ is completely productive if there exists a computable function $f$ such that for every $e$, $f(e)\in (A-W_e)\cup (W_e-A)$‎. ‎A set is effectively non-recursive if it is r.e‎. ‎and its ...
4
votes
2answers
159 views

Does the notion of provably total function depend on the chosen representation?

A typical definition of "provably total function in a theory $T$" goes like this (paraphrased from Odifreddi, Classical Recursion Theory II): A function $f : \mathbb{N}^n \to \mathbb{N}$ is ...
5
votes
0answers
235 views

Rice-like Theorems

Let $\varphi$ be an acceptable programming system. Consider the set $S=\{x\in\mathbb{N}:\varphi_x=\varphi_{x+1}\}$. By using Rogers' Fixed Point Theorem (RFPT) it can be proved that $S$ is a ...
9
votes
0answers
223 views

(A little bit) Beyond the E-recursive

The E-recursive functions are a particular generalization of classical recursion theory to the entire set-theoretic universe, $V$. They are defined via a schemes: see ...
1
vote
0answers
78 views

A reference for “Borel Sets and Circuit Complexity”

Is there any pdf version of M.Sipser's "Borel Sets and Circuit Complexity" or , since I am unable to get this paper, is there other reference closely related to theory in that paper?
4
votes
1answer
77 views

What class of probability distributions do probabilistic turing machines induce? [closed]

What class of probability distributions is induced by the class of probabilistic turing machines? Is there a precise characterization?
13
votes
0answers
140 views

Complexity classes for BSS machines

Given a first-order structure $\mathcal{S}$, a Blum-Shub-Smale machine on $\mathcal{S}$ is essentially a Turing machine where Cells on the tape can hold arbitrary elements of $\mathcal{S}$. The ...
10
votes
0answers
154 views

Can we find minimal-diameter metrics without computability?

A beautiful argument by Nabutovsky and Weinberger (see http://math.uchicago.edu/~shmuel/fractal.ps) shows that, if $M$ is any smooth compact manifold of dimension $\ge 5$, then the diameter functional ...
11
votes
1answer
268 views

Can there be computable non-standard models of PA in a weaker sense?

By Tennenbaum's theorem, in the usual sense of computability for models, neither addition nor multiplication can be computable in a non-standard model of PA. Weak version: Can addition or ...
12
votes
2answers
393 views

Woodin on Posner-Robinson for the hyperjump and sharp

The Posner-Robinson theorem states that, if $X$ is noncomputable, there is some $G$ such that $X\oplus G=G'$; that is, even though genuine jump inversion only works above $0'$, every (nontrivial) $X$ ...
21
votes
2answers
743 views

Antirandom reals

This is a crossposting of http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/1446602/anti-random-reals, which has not gotten any answers; after thinking about the problem, I've become more convinced that it ...