2
votes
1answer
148 views

The word problem of the free left distributive algebra on one generator

A left distributive algebra is a set $A$ together with a binary operation, $\cdot$, satisfying $a\cdot(b\cdot c)=(a\cdot b)\cdot(a\cdot c)$. One important example of left distributive algebras arises ...
7
votes
2answers
197 views

Does forcing with recursively pointed perfect trees add a Turing degree that is minimal over $V$?

A tree $T$ on $\omega$ is recursively pointed if it is recursive in each of its branches. We can consider a variant of Sacks forcing where the conditions are recursively pointed perfect trees ordered ...
10
votes
1answer
422 views

Does Turing determinacy imply full determinacy?

The axiom of Turing determinacy is a weakening of the full axiom of determinacy, $AD$, in which only games with payoff sets which are $\equiv_T$-invariant are demanded to be determined. In "Turing ...
7
votes
1answer
350 views

Demuth's theorem in set theory

I am quite sure the following fact must have been known for set theorists, though I could not find it anywhere. If $r$ is random over $L$ and $x\in L[r]\setminus L$, then there must be some real ...
6
votes
2answers
221 views

Only admissibles start gaps in clockable ordinals

This is a question about ITTM model introduced by Hamkins et al. In this paper it is proven that no admissible ordinal is clockable, so it either starts or lies within a gap in clockable ordinals. I ...
19
votes
1answer
612 views

Why isn't this a computable description of the ordinal of ZF?

In a previous MO question, I was told by several commenters that (a) it's known that there exists a computable ordinal $\alpha_{ZF}$ that "encodes the strength of ZF set theory" (i.e., a least ...
1
vote
1answer
183 views

Would a non-constructible set become constructible if we had oracles of arbitrarily high cardinality for the halting problems of ordinal computers?

I still have trouble to grasp the concept of a non-constructible set, my intuition is that we could "avoid" the non-constructibility of many of them if we assume we have "ordinal computers" extended ...
8
votes
3answers
605 views

What set theoretical questions could never be answered by Turing machines of arbitrary cardinality?

Let us assume that there are Turing machines of arbitrary cardinality, by that I mean they can have input tapes of any arbitrarily high cardinality and compute for a number of steps also of ...
8
votes
0answers
302 views

“Hard” separation results in reverse mathematics (or similar)

This is a fairly broad question. In particular, I specify 5 questions (Q1, Q2.1, Q2.2, Q3, Q4) which for me all fall under one umbrella. Since this is unreasonably broad, I'm really interested in an ...
4
votes
3answers
404 views

Infinite Partitions of the Primes and Sums of Reciprocals (Revised)

I have revised my original post. The questions I asked there were not well-put or even thought through. I don't want to delete, however, since some of the comments may be of interest to other MO ...
2
votes
0answers
246 views

Sorting of countabe set [closed]

Let $X$ be a countable ordered set. My question is very simple - Can we sort $X$ in countable number of steps? When $X$ is finite, the answer is obviously yes. But what is the answer when $X$ is ...
6
votes
1answer
159 views

A well-behaved $A$ that is almost contained in every element of some filter for a countable arithmetically closed family $\mathfrak X$

The question has relevance for constructing Scott sets with certain extra desirable properties. Suppose that $\mathfrak X$ is a countable arithmetically closed family of subsets of $\mathbb N$: ...
9
votes
1answer
287 views

Concerning Silver's result

Jack Silver proved that if $x$ is a real so that every $x$-admissible ordinal is a cardinal in $L$, then $0^{\sharp}$ exists. I wonder whether various weaker or stronger versions of Silver's result ...
3
votes
1answer
162 views

A computability-theoretic preorder on reals

My question is about a fairly artificial preorder on functions from $\omega$ to $\omega$, which for simplicity I'll call "reals." For $r, s\in {}^\omega\omega$, write $r\le_E^*s$ if for each real $f$ ...
22
votes
1answer
636 views

Does an existence of large cardinals have implications in number theory or combinatorics?

Does an existence of large cardinals have implications in more down-to-earth fields like number theory, finite combinatorics, graph theory, Ramsey theory or computability theory? Are there any ...
7
votes
1answer
739 views

Can a Hamkins infinite time Turing Machine with infinite Super Turing jumps (from higher type oracles) get the power to decide $\Sigma_1^2$ sets?

Hamkins showed that his infinite time Turing machine has the power to decide some $\Delta_2^1$ sets. I wonder if some modifications of the machine could be made to reach level $\Sigma_1^2$ sets, or, ...
16
votes
1answer
560 views

Polynomial-time algorithm to compare numbers in Conway chained arrow notation

I am looking for a polynomial-time algorithm which, given a character string containing two numbers in Conway's chained arrow notation for large numbers, indicates whether the first number is less ...
4
votes
1answer
375 views

Definition of HYP in $L_{\omega_1^{CK}}[a]$?

The structure $L_{\omega_1^{CK}}$ consists of only HYP sets (I believe) and HYP in this structure is the same as the actual hyperaritmetic sets. Now if I move to the structure $L_{\omega_1^{CK}}[a]$ ...
6
votes
0answers
167 views

$\omega$-models of $\mathbf{\Sigma^1_1}-DC$ and $\mathbf{\Delta^1_1}-CA$

So what is needed to demonstrate something (say like $L_{\omega_1^{CK}}[a]$ is a $\omega$-models of $\mathbf{\Sigma^1_1}$-$DC$ or $\mathbf{\Delta^1_1}$-$CA$? It's not like I don't understand what the ...
2
votes
2answers
289 views

Second-order undecidability

Hi, The idea of undecidability in computability theory seems to be along the lines of: There can't be an effective procedure, that decides all instances of input, but a single instance can still be ...
9
votes
0answers
257 views

Various definitions of recursion from ordinal machines

Background: I'm trying to get an intuitive understanding of α-recursion and related concepts in higher recursion theory. Once nice book is Peter Hinman's Recursion-Theoretic Hierarchies, available ...
3
votes
0answers
143 views

Alternate proof of van de Wiele's theorem in E-recursion

Hello, all I'm currently trying to understand $E$-recursion theory, which is a generalization of classical recursion theory to arbitrary sets. One of the difficulties I'm having with understanding ...
5
votes
1answer
202 views

Companion of the pointclass of inductive sets

This question is about the notion of a companion for a Spector class, as defined in Moschovakis's book Elementary Induction on Abstract Structures. I am interested in Spector classes on $\mathbb{R}$, ...
19
votes
5answers
13k views

How large is TREE(3) ?

Friedman, in http://www.math.osu.edu/~friedman.8/pdf/EnormousInt112201.pdf, shows that TREE(3) is much larger than n(4), itself bounded below by $A^{A(187195)}(3)$ (where $A$ is the Ackerman ...
5
votes
1answer
497 views

Countable admissible ordinals

Jensen claimed that for any finite increasing sequence countable admissible ordinals $\omega= \alpha_0<\alpha_1\cdots <\alpha_n$, there is a real $x$ so that, for each $m\leq n$, $\alpha_m$ is ...
5
votes
1answer
272 views

Higher computability : Constructive ordinal and $\Delta^1_1$ predicates

Everything I know on this subject comes from Sacks book : "Higher recursion theory" Let $\mathcal{O^Y}$ be the set of codes for ordinals constructive in $Y$. We should have the result that $A ...
23
votes
15answers
4k views

What's a magical theorem in logic?

Some theorems are magical: their hypotheses are easy to meet, and when invoked (as lemmas) in the midst of an otherwise routine proof, they deliver the desired conclusion more or less ...
3
votes
2answers
490 views

Existence of a set of valid Busy-Beaver entries.

In reference to 1961 paper "On Non Computable Functions" by T. Rado. Motivation - Scott Aaronson's Who Can Name the Bigger Number?. M is an n-state binary Turing machine. A valid BB-n entry is a ...
9
votes
4answers
3k views

Pi1-sentence independent of ZF, ZF+Con(ZF), ZF+Con(ZF)+Con(ZF+Con(ZF)), etc.?

Let ZF1 = ZF, ZFk+1 = ZF + the assumption that ZF1,...,ZFk are consistent, ZFω = ZF + the assumption that ZFk is consistent for every positive integer k, ... and similarly define ZFα ...
26
votes
3answers
2k views

“Simpler” statements equivalent to Con(PA) or Con(ZFC)?

Given any reasonable formal system F (e.g., Peano Arithmetic or ZFC), we all know that one can construct a Turing machine that runs forever iff F is consistent, by enumerating the theorems of F and ...
3
votes
1answer
486 views

computable “completion” of ZFC

Let $f : \omega \to \{\text{wffs of set theory}\}$ be a function. Let $\leq_f$ be a total order on $\omega$. Definition: $\langle f,\leq_f \rangle$ is a computable quasi-completion of ZFC if and ...
10
votes
2answers
624 views

Is Robinson Arithmetic biinterpretable with some theory in LST?

Let ZFC$^{\text{fin}}$ be ZFC minus the axiom of infinity plus the negation of the axiom of infinity. It is well-known that ZFC$^{\text{fin}}$ is biinterpretable with Peano Arithmetic. In this sense ...
2
votes
1answer
475 views

Semidecidable sets

A set $S$ (of natural numbers) is (semi)decidable if its (semi)characteristic function is effectively calculable. From a set theoretic point of view, the semicharacteristic function of a set is just ...
9
votes
2answers
728 views

Martin's cone theorem and recursion theory

Martin's remarkable cone theorem in the theory of determinacy says the following: Suppose $A\subseteq \omega^\omega$ is Turing invariant and determined. If $\forall x\exists y(x\le_T y\& y\in ...
4
votes
2answers
304 views

How does the Constructibility Degree of a real compare with its Turing Degree?

Specifically, is it the case that (for $a,b\in\omega^\omega$) $a$ $\leq_T$ $b$ implies $a$ $\leq_c$ $b$? I suspect it might be trivial, but not knowing much Recursion Theory, it's hard to see how it ...
5
votes
1answer
304 views

An eventually different function adding no Solovay real nor dominating function?

Definitions I believe set theorists have studied all of the following three notions in the context of forcing extensions of a model of ZFC, $M$ (hopefully the terminology is the standard one). A ...
35
votes
8answers
4k views

Succinctly naming big numbers: ZFC versus Busy-Beaver

Years ago, I wrote an essay called Who Can Name the Bigger Number?, which posed the following challenge: You have fifteen seconds. Using standard math notation, English words, or both, name a single ...
13
votes
5answers
1k views

Finding the largest integer describable with a string of symbols of predefined length

(This question is motivated by the reading of the article Large numbers and unprovable theorems by Joel Spencer, which can be found at ...
5
votes
1answer
232 views

When do cofinal chains of universal codings of the integers exist?

Universal codings of integers A (binary) coding of the integers is a prefix-free code of the natural numbers, whose codewords are non-decreasing in size. A coding is universal if it is short enough ...
0
votes
3answers
610 views

Do all uncountable sets contain elements with infinite Kolmogorov complexity?

Otherwise, if all the elements in a set can be represented by a at most n symbols (finite Kolmogorov complexity), I could count them by creating a n dimensional pairing function. Or atleast, that is ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Axiom of Computable Choice versus Axiom of Choice

What would be the consequence of requiring that any choice function be computable; i.e. using as the foundational basis ZF + ACC? Does it make a difference if we admit definable functions? I guess I ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What is a universal function?

This question stems from Dick Lipton's recent blog post on the Axiom of Choice. I asked there but got no takers. I promise I'm not an inept Googler, but I couldn't find a satisfactory answer. I ...
-2
votes
1answer
310 views

Properties of collections (functions) that make them proper classes (uncomputable)

There are collections too big to be a set, e.g. the collection of all sets (in ZFC), and there are collections that cannot be sets for "pure" logical reasons, e.g. the collection of sets that do not ...
38
votes
5answers
4k views

Which graphs are Cayley graphs?

Every group presentation determines the corresponding Cayley graph, which has a node for each group element, and arrows labeled with the generators to get from one group element to another. My main ...
4
votes
6answers
901 views

Are there nonequivalent randomnesses?

There are nonequivalent geometries, nonequivalent groups finite and infinite, nonequivalent logics ( fregean and nofregean http://www.formalontology.it/suszkor.htm), even nonequivalent logicians;-) ...
14
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there a computable model of ZFC?

Background Assuming ZFC is consistent, then by downward Löwenheim–Skolem, there is a countable model (M,$\in$) of ZFC. Since the universe M is countable, we may as well think of it as actually being ...