computable sets and functions, Turing degrees, c.e. degrees, models of computability, primitive recursion, oracle computation, models of computability, decision problems, undecidability, Turing jump, halting problem, notions of computable randomness, computable model theory, computable equivalence ...

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0
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2answers
262 views

Recent progress on the busy beaver problem? [on hold]

Has there been any progress on the Busy beaver problem in the last few years? It seems like there hasn't been much work done on the problem since 2010. Is there anything amateurs can do to solve the ...
6
votes
0answers
156 views

$\alpha$-minimal degrees for singular $\alpha$

An important question in $\alpha$-recursion theory is whether there is a minimal $\alpha$-degree at $\alpha=\aleph_\omega.$ Question 1. Who first introduced the above question, and where can I find ...
-1
votes
1answer
92 views

recursively enumerable sets [closed]

A set $S$ said to be recursively enumerable if There is an algorithm that enumerates the members of $S$. That means that its output is simply a list of the members of $S$: $s_1$, $s_2$, $s_3$, ... . ...
9
votes
1answer
196 views

Is an explicit $c$ known to lead to a noncomputable Julia set?

Braverman & Yampolsky have shown that there exist noncomputable Julia sets, i.e., there exist $c \in \mathbb{C}$ such that the Julia set of $f(z) = c + z^2$ is not computable. "A set is ...
7
votes
2answers
285 views

Topological tameness beyond the Gandy-Harrington topology

The Gandy-Harrington topology on $\omega^\omega$ is the topology generated by all lightface $\Sigma^1_1$ sets; that is, all sets which are continuous-in-the-usual-sense images of $\omega^\omega$. ...
1
vote
0answers
93 views

Analogue break down between complexity theory and computability theory

Motivated by my post, Is there a program for theory of incompleteness in NP, much of NP-completeness theory has been heavily influenced by computability theory for which we were successful in proving ...
6
votes
1answer
220 views

Can ITTM recognize a non-measurable set?

Throughout the question ITTM refers to Hamkins' infinite Turing machines, though I will be interested in results related to stronger models. Recently I was wondering, is it consistent that there is ...
4
votes
1answer
166 views

Induction and nonstandard halting times of standard machines

For a nonstandard model of enough arithmetic - say, $\mathcal{N}\models I\Sigma_1$ - we can define the set of halting times of standard machines relative to $\mathcal{N}$: ...
5
votes
1answer
114 views

Minimal degrees of structures

For this question, a structure means a first-order structure in a computable language with domain $\omega$; a copy of a structure $\mathcal{A}$ is a structure $\mathcal{B}\cong\mathcal{A}$. Given a ...
11
votes
0answers
341 views

Decidability of $x^3+y^3+z^3 = c$

I wondering if it is known whether the following problem is algorithmically decidable or undecidable by Turing machines: given an integer c, determine if there are integers $(x,y,z)$ such that ...
1
vote
0answers
177 views

Seeking reference to result in this talk by Voevodsky [duplicate]

In this presentation by Vladimir Voevodsky [1], he mentions a result that there is a formula over the natural numbers with a single free variable such that one can prove that there is no algorithmic ...
6
votes
1answer
176 views

Degree of unsolvability of finding a open approximation to a Borel set, given its Borel code

It is well known that every Borel set has the property of Baire. That is, for every Borel set $B$, there is an open set $U$ and a sequence of dense open sets $D_n$ such that for every $x\in \cap_n ...
7
votes
1answer
90 views

A decision problem for clones

E. Post proved that there are only countably many clones on a two-element set (classes of operations closed under superposition and containing all projections). All these clones are finitely ...
7
votes
1answer
247 views

Can you decide whether the commutator subgroup of a f.p. group is f.g?

Is the following algorithmic problem known to be decidable/undecidable? Input: a finite group presentation $P$. Decide: is the commutator subgroup of the group presented by $P$ finitely generated?
2
votes
0answers
108 views

Inverse Ackermann Function

The inverse Ackermann function is defined over the natural numbers as follows: ($[x]$ means that we round up x to the nearest integer, while $\log^*$ is the iterated log function discussed here: ...
3
votes
1answer
228 views

Hamkins infinite time Turing machines: dovetailing ordinal time

It is claimed in the Hamkins and Lewis founding article "Infinite time Turing machines" (proof of the gap existence theorem 3.4) that for $\omega$ steps of a computation of a machine performing a ...
12
votes
1answer
365 views

Computer software for periods

Kontsevich and Zagier define a period as an integral of a rational function (over $\mathbb{Q}$) defined on a $\mathbb{Q}$-semialgebraic set. They conjecture that if two periods are equal, then the ...
11
votes
1answer
488 views

Continuous functions and 2-bushy trees

The following problem was asked by Joe Miller in the fall of 2010 at a bar in Madison. A subtree $T \subseteq 4^{< \omega}$ is $2$-bushy if for some node $\sigma \in T$, every node above $\sigma$ ...
3
votes
1answer
146 views

A question on many-one reducibility

Let $\phi_0,\phi_1,\phi_2,\ldots$ be an acceptable programming system. For each $x\in\mathbb{N}$, let $W_x$ the domain of $\phi_x$, and let $K=\{x\in\mathbb{N}:W_x\neq\emptyset\}$. Is there a ...
2
votes
2answers
161 views

Computable Categories in the most direct sense?

While there is a lot of work in category related to notions of realizability and computability, etc... I've failed to find work on categories that are computable in the sense of having object and ...
6
votes
1answer
211 views

What is known about the boundary between Richardson's theorem and the Tarski-Seidenberg theorem?

Tarski proved that equalities and inequalities in can be decided over $\mathbb{R}[x].$ Richardson proved that adding composition with the sine and exponential functions caused the problem to become ...
12
votes
0answers
263 views

The topos for forcing in computability theory

My understanding is that forcing (such as Cohen forcing) can be described via a topos. For example this nlab article on forcing describes forcing as a "the topos of sheaves on a suitable site." My ...
0
votes
1answer
194 views

Is there a nontrivial maximally recursive function? [closed]

Say that a (recursive) function $f:\Bbb N\rightarrow\Bbb N$ is maximally recursive if, for all $n\in\Bbb N$, the value $f(n+1)$ can be calculated only by first knowing $f(n)$. A rather trivial example ...
7
votes
2answers
224 views

Recent trends in effective analysis

The references listed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computable_analysis have all been published 30-15 years ago. Are the approaches which these references expose still up-to-date and relevant to the ...
7
votes
2answers
269 views

Decidability of diophantine equation in a theory

Given a theory $T \subseteq \operatorname{Th}(\mathbb{N})$, define the decision problem $D_T$ as follows: Given a polynomial $p$ with integer coefficients and variables $\bar{x}$, decide whether ...
22
votes
0answers
672 views

On certain representations of algebraic numbers in terms of trigonometric functions

Let's say that a real number has a simple trigonometric representation, if it can be represented as a product of zero or more rational powers of positive integers and zero or more (positive or ...
5
votes
2answers
328 views

TM and abstract algebra

Usually, during lectures Turing Machines are firstly introduced from an informal point of view (for example, in this way: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_machine#Informal_description) and then ...
1
vote
2answers
229 views

Is there a pairing function from countable ordinals to $\mathbb N$? [closed]

It is well-known that there is a computable pairing function $<\ >:\mathbb N^2\to \mathbb N$. Let $X$ be some reasonable class of countable ordinals ($\omega_1^{CK}$, $\epsilon_0$, ...
11
votes
1answer
560 views

Is forcing computable?

By results similar to Tennenbaum's theorem we know that there exist no computable models of $ZF$. But suppose we are given, as a sort of oracle, access to some model of $ZF$ (e.g. we can make oracle ...
12
votes
1answer
557 views

Is there a known primitive recursive upper bound on the nth “Zhang prime”

(This question is pure curiosity. Feel free to close it if you feel it is not appropriate for mathoverflow.) In 2013 Zhang showed that there are infinitely many pairs of primes which are less that ...
5
votes
0answers
67 views

TCAs (total combinatory algebras) with oracles

Is there a natural, non-trivial example of a TCA (total combinatory algebra, cf. pca) with a natural notion of an oracle?
0
votes
0answers
79 views

Counting path generating sentences in a specific formal language

Given a formal grammar of a language or an Turing machine of the language, can we count the path that generating sentences of the language? For example, we know that if the grammar is context-free ...
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Is below every cohesive set a 1-generic?

A set $X$ is called cohesive for $(R_i)_{i\in \mathbb{N}}$ if it is infinite and for each $i$ we have $X\subseteq^* R_i$ or $X\subseteq^* \overline{R_i}$. (Where $X\subseteq^*Y$ means that $X$ is ...
2
votes
3answers
276 views

Prove existence of different programs printing each other code

How to prove that there exist two different programs A and B such that A printing code of B and B printing code of A without giving actual examples of such programs? Update: We could prove via ...
9
votes
1answer
305 views

Busy beaver function vs low Turing degrees

Let $BB(n)$ denote busy beaver function. It's well known that $BB(n)$ dominates all computable functions (I'm quite certain it includes partial computable functions too). However, I was wondering if ...
4
votes
2answers
241 views

A (“Rice-like”) conjecture about the decidability of primitive recursive (PR) problems

Question: is the conjecture below true? Consider decision problems in which the instance is (the PR index, definition, or LOOP program of) a primitive recursive function. Denote the PR function (with ...
4
votes
2answers
215 views

Relation between Turing degrees and functions computable with them

Suppose $A<_T B$ ($A$ is a set computable from $B$ but not vice versa). Is it always the case that there exists a $B$-computable function which eventually outgrows all $A$-computable functions? Of ...
-1
votes
2answers
430 views

Can an algorithm decide whether a program computes all strings? [closed]

I am interested in the type of program, which is given as input to a Universal Turing Machine (UTM) with language $L$, and for which it holds that every possible finite string $s$ of symbols in $L$ ...
3
votes
1answer
329 views

Are there sets which are computable in one model, but uncomputable in another?

Suppose we have two models of set theory, $U$ and $V$ which have the same $\Bbb N$. Is it possible that there is a set $A\subseteq\Bbb N$ such that, in $U$, this set is computable, i.e. there is a ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

The link and equivalence between variant definition of computation model and computational complexity over reals

To unify the numerical computation and classic computability theory, or to pave a foundation for the numerical computation, mathematicians present variant computation model and computational ...
1
vote
1answer
173 views

The definition of computational complexity or complexity measure of computing reals [closed]

A real $r$ is computable if given any $i\in \mathbb{N}$, the $i$th bit can be outputed by a Turing Machine or an algorithm. So, what is computational complexity or complexity measure of computing the ...
4
votes
0answers
170 views

Recursively Pointed Sacks Forcing and Preserving $\omega_1$

Let $\mathbb{P}$ denote recursively pointed Sacks forcing. This is forcing with recursively pointed perfect trees ordered by inclusion. A tree $T \subseteq {}^{<\omega}2$ is recursively pointed if ...
4
votes
0answers
88 views

Upper bound on ranks of well-founded trees in $SKI\Omega$ calculus

All ideas explained below are due to A.P.Goucher, and defined here. First of all, $SKI\Omega$ calculus is an extension of standard SKI calculus, with additional type of combinator, called oracle ...
9
votes
1answer
342 views

Sets computable from enough hints

Is there a non-computable set $X\subset\omega$ such that, for some $Y\subset\omega$, any infinite subset or cosubset (=subset of the complement) of $Y$ computes $X$? More generally, call a set $X$ ...
3
votes
1answer
261 views

On fast-growing hierarchy

Is there exists a recursively enumerable set of computable total fast-growing functions $(\mathbb N \rightarrow \mathbb N)$ such, that this set has no upper boundary in the set of all such functions ...
2
votes
2answers
111 views

Background for Kierstead terms

I was looking at some slides of John Longley's here, where he mentions "the Kierstead functional" $$\lambda f.f(\lambda x.f(\lambda y.x)) \ ,$$ (where $f$ should be of type $2$, and $x,y$ of ground ...
1
vote
1answer
160 views

Total conditional complexity

By $C(|)$ denote conditional complexity. By $CT(|)$ denote total conditional complexity. For every n there exist two strings $x$ and $y$ of length $n$ such that $C(x|y) = O(1)$ but $CT(x|y) \ge n $. ...
-2
votes
1answer
98 views

What are the formula of representation of quasicrystals and the law or mechanism of the formation [closed]

I vaguely recall that formula of representation of quasicrystals is relevant to tiling plane,and tiling plane without period is relevant to recursiveness, and do not know the mechanism or physics ...
-3
votes
1answer
291 views

When are two algorithms essentially the same? [closed]

Inspired by Blass/Dershowitz/Gurevich's paper When are two algorithms the same? (which was referenced in another context here) I tried to boil down the question to the following situation: Consider ...
3
votes
0answers
116 views

What is the relation between the length of period of simple continued fraction expansion of quadratic algebraic numbers $\sqrt{A}$ and the integer $A$

What is the relation between the length of period of simple continued fraction expansion of quadratic algebraic numbers and the integer As we know,$\sqrt{2} = [1;2,2,2,2,…]$; while $\sqrt{14}= ...