9
votes
1answer
500 views

4 squares almost in an arithmetic progression

Does there exist infinitely many coprime pairs of integers x,d such that x, x+d, x+2d, x+4d are all square numbers? One example would be 49,169,289,529. This is the only example I have found so far ...
0
votes
0answers
162 views

Greedy sequences without k-term arithmetic progressions

If $S_k$ is the greedy sequence with no length-k arithmetic subsequence, (ie $S_3$ = A003278 , $S_4$ = A005837 , $S_5$ = A020655 ), is it guaranteed that any other sequence $a$ with no length-k ...
3
votes
1answer
141 views

Non-asymptotically densest progression-free sets

For the context of this question, a progression-free set is a subset of integers that does not contain length-three arithmetic progressions. For large $N$, it is known that $[N] = \{1, \ldots, N\}$ ...
10
votes
0answers
378 views

What are the limits of the Erdős-Rankin method for covering intervals by arithmetic progressions?

To construct gaps between primes which are marginally larger than average, Erdős and Rankin covered an interval $[1,y]$ with arithmetic progressions with prime differences. A nice short exposition is ...
22
votes
1answer
922 views

Arithmetic Progressions of Squares

Fermat may or may not have known that there are 3-term arithmetic progressions of squares (like $1^2, 5^2, 7^2$, and that there are no 4-term APs. Murky history aside, Keith Conrad has two pleasant ...
6
votes
1answer
426 views

Minimum cardinality of a difference set in $R^n$

Cross-posted from http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/65195/minimum-cardinality-of-a-difference-set-in-mathbb-rn. Given a finite set $S$ of $m$ points in $\mathbb R^n$ that do not all lie in the ...
2
votes
3answers
610 views

Arithmetic progressions of length 3 in subset of Z_n of size n^d

Let $A\subset\mathbb{Z}/n\mathbb{Z}$ such that: $|A|>n^{d}$ ($0< d <1$). Let $C=\{(x,y,2y-x)\in A\times A \times A\}$ be the set of $3$-term arithmetic progressions within $A$. [The ...
15
votes
2answers
854 views

Roth's theorem and Behrend's lower bound

Roth's theorem on 3-term arithmetic progressions (3AP) is concerned with the value of $r_3(N)$, which is defined as the cardinality of the largest subset of the integers between 1 and N with no ...
5
votes
3answers
371 views

Structure of nonaveraging sets of integers

A set of integers is said to be nonaveraging if it contains no three-term arithmetic progression. I call a nonaveraging subset of $\lbrace 1,2, \ldots ,n \rbrace$ optimal when it has maximal ...
17
votes
4answers
1k views

Arithmetic progressions inside polynomial sets

There are at most 3 perfect squares in arithmetic progression (Fermat, Euler). It was shown in [1] that if $n>2$ there are no three term arithmetic progression consisting of nth powers. Take a ...
2
votes
0answers
917 views

Fun question in additive combinatorics

It is easy to see that for a finite set of integers $A$ of cardinality $n$, the cardinality of the sumset $A+A$ satisfies $$ 2n-1\leq |A+A|\leq \frac{n(n+1)}{2}. $$ The lower bound is essentially ...
6
votes
1answer
333 views

Bounds on the size of sets not containing a given finite pattern

Recall the following version of Szemerédi's Theorem: let $r_k(N)$ be the largest cardinality of a subset of $[N]:=\{1,\ldots, N\}$ which does not contain an arithmetic progression of length $k$. Then, ...
4
votes
1answer
343 views

How large can a non-sumset be?

The theory of sumsets $A+B$ where $A$ and $B$ are finite subsets of an additive group $Z$ is extensively studied in additive combinatorics: finding long arithmetic progressions inside them, finding ...
12
votes
2answers
577 views

Arithmetic progressions modulo $p$ under the squaring map

I feel that the following problem should be known, but I'm not sure where to look for it. Fix a real constant $\frac{1}{2} \ge \epsilon > 0$. For varying primes $p$, Let $A_p$ denote the set of ...
5
votes
3answers
392 views

Any rigorous way to claim that sums with repeat summands are few?

Let $B \subset \mathbb{Z}^+$. Define $r_{B,h}(n)$ to be the number of ways of writing $n$ as the sum of $h$ elements of $B$ and $R_{B,h}(n)$ the number of ways to write $n$ as the sum of $h$ DISTINCT ...
5
votes
2answers
611 views

Inverse Length 3 Arithmetic Progression Problem for sets with positive upper density

It is a famous theorem of Roth, which Szemerédi famously generalized, that if a set of natural numbers has positive upper density then it contains arithmetic progressions of length $k$. The famous ...
15
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the shortest route to Roth's theorem?

Roth first proved that any subset of the integers with positive density contains a three term arithmetic progression in 1953. Since then, many other proofs have emerged (I can think of eight off the ...
7
votes
1answer
574 views

Homogeneous arithmetic progressions in difference sets

I have a nasty feeling that I ought to be able to answer this question, but I've got other things to think about right now and I'm interested in the answer just so that I can reply to a mathematical ...
13
votes
1answer
587 views

Goldbach-type theorems from dense models?

I'm not a number theorist, so apologies if this is trivial or obvious. From what I understand of the results of Green-Tao-Ziegler on additive combinatorics in the primes, the main new technical tool ...
5
votes
2answers
367 views

k-pseudorandom measures

In reading the paper of Green and Tao on arithmetic progressions within the primes, I became very interested in the notion of a k-pseudorandom measure discussed in that paper. A measure here is a ...