Take the 2-minute tour ×
MathOverflow is a question and answer site for professional mathematicians. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've just finished teaching a year-long "foundations of algebraic geometry" class. It was my third time teaching it, and my notes are gradually converging. I've enjoyed it for a number of reasons (most of all the students, who were smart, hard-working, and from a variety of fields). I've particularly enjoyed talking with experts (some in nearby fields, many active on mathoverflow) about what one should (or must!) do in a first schemes course. I've been pleasantly surprised to find that those who have actually thought about teaching such a course (and hence who know how little can be covered) tend to agree on what is important, even if they are in very different parts of the subject. I want to raise this question here as well:

What topics/examples/ideas etc. really really should be learned in a year-long first serious course in schemes?

Here are some constraints. Certainly most excellent first courses ignore some or all of these constraints, but I include them to focus the answers. The first course in question should be purely algebraic. (The reason for this constraint: to avoid a debate on which is the royal road to algebraic geometry --- this is intended to be just one way in. But if the community thinks that a first course should be broader, this will be reflected in the voting.) The course should be intended for people in all parts of algebraic geometry. It should attract smart people in nearby areas. It should not get people as quickly as possible into your particular area of research. Preferences: It can (and, I believe, must) be hard. As much as possible, essential things must be proved, with no handwaving (e.g. "with a little more work, one can show that...", or using exercises which are unreasonably hard). Intuition should be given when possible.

Why I'm asking: I will likely edit the notes further, and hope to post them in chunks over the 2010-11 academic year to provoke further debate. Some hastily-written thoughts are here, if you are curious.

As usual for big-list questions: one topic per answer please. There is little point giving obvious answers (e.g. "definition of a scheme"), so I'm particularly interested in things you think others might forget or disagree with, or things often omitted, or things you wish someone had told you when you were younger. Or propose dropping traditional topics, or a nontraditional ordering of traditional topics. Responses addressing prerequisites such as "it shouldn't cover any commutative algebra, as participants should take a serious course in that subject as a prerequisite" are welcome too. As the most interesting responses might challenge (or defend) conventional wisdom, please give some argument or evidence in favor of your opinion.

Update later in 2010: I am posting the notes, after suitable editing, and trying to take into account the advice below, here. I hope to reach (near) the end some time in summer 2011. Update July 2011: I have indeed reached near the end some time in summer 2011.

share|improve this question
1  
Dear Ravi, while I'm not sure if this should be taught in a first schemes course, but it's something that I'd love to see exposited more fully. Jim Borger gave an outline of a program to jump straight into algebraic spaces, skipping schemes entirely. Maybe you could figure out a way to do it? sbseminar.wordpress.com/2009/08/06/… –  Harry Gindi Jun 17 '10 at 12:57
10  
Community wiki? –  Loop Space Jun 17 '10 at 14:28
4  
It's also worth linking to the meta discussion that Ravi started to help him craft this question before asking it: tea.mathoverflow.net/discussion/446/… –  Loop Space Jun 17 '10 at 14:30
4  
A parsing question: does "first serious schemes course" mean that there could be a prior, not-so-serious course on schemes? Or do you mean "first, serious schemes course"? –  Pete L. Clark Jun 17 '10 at 17:15
3  
Re: community wiki. Ravi considered this (see the meta thread mentioned above), and decided against it, so I'm not going to use the wiki-hammer unless asked. –  Scott Morrison Jun 17 '10 at 19:42

31 Answers 31

Dear Ravi,

Here is my suggestion for a list of topics in an intro schemes course: open the table of contents of Hartshorne's book. That is the list of topics that should be covered in a first schemes course. And although the many alternatives to Hartshorne's book all have their selling points, I still feel the best choice for an introductory text is Hartshorne's book. I am not writing this to be contrary to your goal of writing a better foundations book. But I honestly and earnestly believe AG students must learn Hartshorne, and (usually) the earlier the better.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.