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I always have trouble with editing math papers for publication. I know there are plenty of checklists for English exposition but is there one for math specific exposition errors?

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Could you possibly link to one of these English exposition checklists; it is not quite clear to me what you are looking for. There are several short books, booklets, other documents that give advice on math writing. But it seems you are after something more specific. It is however not clear to me what it is precisely. –  quid Mar 7 '13 at 21:44
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Something like this: writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/CommonErrors.html. Its not a book but a short list of "before you submit anything look to see if you did any of these things!" –  Daniel Parry Mar 7 '13 at 22:13
    
Thank you, it is clear now. –  quid Mar 7 '13 at 23:58
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3 Answers 3

Please have a look on these two lists (this one and that one).

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Thanks! I wonder if others have other versions of this. –  Daniel Parry Mar 7 '13 at 21:30
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@Daniel Parry: I am not sure what you mean by 'other versions' but there is a brief booklet (about 50 pages) by the same author published by the EMS: Jerzy Trzeciak, Writing Mathematical Papers in English, a practical guide ems-ph.org/books/book.php?proj_nr=34 –  quid Mar 7 '13 at 21:41
    
I mean I made this a community wiki to see how many similar 'checklists' (quick references of common mistakes) for editing. –  Daniel Parry Mar 7 '13 at 22:12
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In the same spirit as above: look at the video where Jean-Pierre Serre explains in English how to write mathematics - badly!

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xf88b5_jean-pierre-serre-writing-mathemati_tech#.UTsRq44zVHI

Often hilarious, but so true...

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See Also:

Steenrod, N.E.; Halmos, P.R.; Schiffer, M.M.; Dieudonné, Jean A.; How to write mathematics. American Mathematical Society (1973).

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